Analizy

Historical vs Current Emissions: Towards an Ethical and Political Synergy in International Climate Policy

Environmental problems transcend not only national borders but also historical periods. And yet debates on the necessary measures and timelines are often constrained by considerations of election cycles (or dynastic successions) in any given country.

Instytut Boyma 11.12.2021

Environmental problems transcend not only national borders but also historical periods. And yet debates on the necessary measures and timelines are often constrained by considerations of election cycles (or dynastic successions) in any given country. United Nations Secretary General António Guterres may have called on rich countries to do better in delivering 100 billion dollars in climate finance promised to the developing world (Hassan 2021), but the very fact that key actors need to be reminded of the intertwining of the global and local commitments in the world of rapid planetary change is proof that they have not yet lived up to their historical role and responsibility.

When combined, Europe and the United States cumulatively account for nearly half of the global greenhouse gas emissions since 1715 (Tooze 2021). This is what underpins the inherited wealth of Western societies. This is also what bankrolled imperial politics of the past and continues to bankroll neo-colonial exploits of today. And this is what makes the Global South wary and weary of the Global North’s admonishments. Even as the climatic and ecological conditions that until recently seemed to provide a stable – indeed everlasting – background to humankind’s rise begin to unravel, those that still play catch-up may feel entitled to ask: why should we give up the fruits of growth that others have gorged themselves on? It may not be “rational” for countries to resist calls for sacrifice in solving a problem that come from those who caused the problem in the first place, but given the proclivities of human psychology (to which national and global leaders are by no means immune) this is what is most likely going to happen (Robinson 2021).

That does not mean that these admonishments are not warranted. While European and American contribution to the problem of historical greenhouse gas emissions amounts to nearly 50 percent, in terms of current emissions it falls to less than a quarter, and even though this is still much more than the western countries’ fair share of the global carbon budget, “[w]hether they decarbonize or not, the climate crisis will go on” (Tooze 2021). Historical emissions need to be acknowledged and properly compensated for, but they have already been generated and cannot be undone (unless much-touted carbon capture projects exceed all reasonable expectations). The only emissions that can still be brought under control are those in the coming years and decades, with the bulk of them to be generated by non-Western economies, which means that this is where greater emissions reductions must occur (Robinson 2021).

These reductions cannot be guaranteed at required levels unless key actors recognise the interrelatedness of their fates. “No dimension of world affairs is more multipolar than the climate crisis” and for all their historical responsibility and inherited wealth, Western states cannot solve the problem on their own, which makes it all the more important for them to realise they need leverage over others to bring about the necessary levels of emissions reductions (Tooze 2021). This can only be achieved if the persistently side-lined issue of historical responsibility is resolved head-on, not least by modelling the right kind of behaviour (Robinson 2021). Thus the moral and the pragmatic – the ethical and the political – come together.

If financial and technical support for those at the receiving end of climate impacts is necessary, so is expanding social safety nets for those that stand to lose from the green transition in the short term. Globalization and trade liberalization may have improved GDP but also led to inequality and shortage of good jobs; decarbonisation could well go down the same path, creating winners and losers (Tagliapietra 2021). It is therefore imperative to combine responsibility for historical and current emissions with social justice. Mitigating the impacts of climate change needs to go hand in hand with mitigating social ills; otherwise, resulting tensions and disruptions may undermine the whole enterprise. If successful, such a combined approach can help ensure that developing countries do not resort to the same destructive methods on which the prosperity of the West was founded (Robinson 2021).

At the same time, care needs to be taken not to fall for simplistic solutions that risk destabilising the fragile international consensus on the ultimately non-partisan nature of the planetary threat. Arguably, the securitization of climate change may lead to generous spending on key projects and in key areas (after all, military budgets seldom fall prey to so-called “austerity”), thus contributing to mitigation and adaptation, but may also end up “turning the most climate-vulnerable entities into security threats” and promoting inward-looking national strategies (Hassan 2021). This could in turn lead to aggravating geopolitical fault lines and forestalling concerted global efforts necessary to protect populations vulnerable to natural disasters, resource scarcity, social strife, and political discord in the wake of deteriorating planetary conditions.

To achieve climate stabilisation, acknowledging and making amends for historical emissions must be recognised as no less important than driving current emissions down. These two goals are not mutually exclusive; on the contrary, they act synergistically, with the moral dimension of redressing historical wrongs vital in stimulating political efforts to ensure that current and future wrongs are mitigated or, better still, prevented. As with many other aspects of the current climatic and ecological predicament, synergies can work both against humanity and in its best interest.

Przypisy:

Bibliography

 

Hassan, Asif Muztaba. “Is Securitization of Climate Change a Boon or Bane?”. The Diplomat 27.07.2021. https://thediplomat.com/2021/07/is-securitization-of-climate-change-a-boon-or-bane/ [accessed 12.08.2021]

 

Robinson, Nathan J. “How To Think About International Responsibility For Climate Change”. Current Affairs 03.08.2021. https://www.currentaffairs.org/2021/08/how-to-think-about-international-responsibility-for-climate-change [accessed 12.08.2021]

 

Tagliapietra, Simone. “A Safety Net for the Green Economy”. Foreign Affairs 19.07.2021. https://www.foreignaffairs.com/articles/united-states/2021-07-19/safety-net-green-economy [accessed 12.08.2021]

 

Tooze, Adam. “Present at the Creation of a Climate Alliance—or Climate Conflict”. Foreign Policy 6.08.2021. https://foreignpolicy.com/2021/08/06/climate-conflict-europe-us-green-trade-war/ [accessed 12.08.2021]

Dawid Juraszek

Ekspert ds. globalnych problemów środowiskowych. Pisarz, poeta, publicysta, wieloletni wykładowca w chińskim szkolnictwie wyższym. Doktorant Uniwersytetu w Maastricht, absolwent filologii angielskiej, przywództwa w oświacie, zarządzania środowiskiem i stosunków międzynarodowych. Poza Polską publikował w USA, Wielkiej Brytanii, Kanadzie i Australii.

czytaj więcej

Tydzień w Azji #187: Narasta po cichu spór Chin z Indonezją na Północnym Morzu Natuna

Przegląd Tygodnia w Azji to zbiór najważniejszych informacji ze świata polityki i gospodarki państw azjatyckich mijającego tygodnia, tworzony przez analityków Instytutu Boyma we współpracy z Polskim Towarzystwem Wspierania Przedsiębiorczości.

Azjatech #45: Koronawirus zmienia e-commerce. Oto lekcja z Państwa Środka

Azjatech to cotygodniowy przegląd najważniejszych informacji o innowacjach i technologii w krajach Azji, tworzony przez zespół analityków Instytutu Boyma we współpracy z Polskim Towarzystwem Wspierania Przedsiębiorczości.

Azjatech #129: Południowokoreański precedens Google

Azjatech to cotygodniowy przegląd najważniejszych informacji o innowacjach i technologii w krajach Azji, tworzony przez zespół analityków Instytutu Boyma we współpracy z Polskim Towarzystwem Wspierania Przedsiębiorczości.

Tydzień w Azji #77: Uzbecki sektor bankowy szuka międzynarodowego wsparcia

Przegląd Tygodnia w Azji to zbiór najważniejszych informacji ze świata polityki i gospodarki państw azjatyckich mijającego tygodnia, tworzony przez analityków Instytutu Boyma we współpracy z Polskim Towarzystwem Wspierania Przedsiębiorczości.

Azjatech #75: Sztuczna inteligencja w Indiach. Wielomiliardowy rynek zdominowany przez Zachód

Azjatech to cotygodniowy przegląd najważniejszych informacji o innowacjach i technologii w krajach Azji, tworzony przez zespół analityków Instytutu Boyma we współpracy z Polskim Towarzystwem Wspierania Przedsiębiorczości.

Azjatech #10 Szanghaj: segreguj odpady lub płać

Azjatech to cotygodniowy przegląd najważniejszych informacji o innowacjach i technologii w krajach Azji, tworzony przez zespół analityków Instytutu Boyma we współpracy z Polskim Towarzystwem Wspierania Przedsiębiorczości.

RP: Co Kazachstan oferuje inwestorom z zagranicy?

W Kazachstanie stworzono 10 specjalnych stref ekonomicznych oraz 42 strefy przemysłowe, których specjalny status prawno-finansowy ma przyciągnąć zagranicznych inwestorów.

Patrycja Pendrakowska i Krzysztof Zalewski uczestnikami Europejskiego Kongresu Gospodarczego w Katowicach

Eksperci wezmą udział w godzinach w sesji "Future cz. I. Rozmowy o trendach przyszłości", w którym poruszone będą zagadnienia z obszaru technologii, geopolityki, rynku pracy i edukacji, e-commerce oraz klimatu.

Forbes: Czas Indopacyfiku. Tak 2021 r. przejdzie do historii

Mijające dwanaście miesięcy będziemy wspominać głównie jako okres smutku i niepokoju. Miliony ludzi opłakuje stratę swoich bliskich, którzy odeszli z powodu pandemii. Straszy kryzys klimatyczny, przejawiający się suszami, powodziami, huraganowymi wiatrami i innymi gwałtownymi zjawiskami pogodowymi. Rywalizacja Chin i USA grozi przerodzeniem się w otwarty konflikt.

Forbes: Australijskie wybory. Wątpliwy prezent na platynowy jubileusz Elżbiety II

Nowy rząd lewicy na antypodach obiecuje wiele zmian. Nieco niespodziewanie i tylnymi drzwiami wróciła jednak zapomniana sprawa ustroju: czy Australia stanie się republiką?

Azjatech #70: Chińscy producenci samochodów elektrycznych w starciu z Teslą

Azjatech to cotygodniowy przegląd najważniejszych informacji o innowacjach i technologii w krajach Azji, tworzony przez zespół analityków Instytutu Boyma we współpracy z Polskim Towarzystwem Wspierania Przedsiębiorczości.

Tydzień w Azji #65: Wielkie zakupy gigantów na rynku naftowym

Przegląd Tygodnia w Azji to zbiór najważniejszych informacji ze świata polityki i gospodarki państw azjatyckich mijającego tygodnia, tworzony przez analityków Instytutu Boyma we współpracy z Polskim Towarzystwem Wspierania Przedsiębiorczości.

RP: Uzbekistan negocjuje z WTO. Czy na akcesji zyska polski przemysł farmaceutyczny?

Branża farmaceutyczna jest jednym z najbardziej perspektywicznych pól współpracy Polski z Uzbekistanem. Planowana akcesja tego kraju do Światowej Organizacji Handlu (WTO) może znacznie ułatwić wymianę handlową i inwestycyjną między dwoma państwami.

Azjatech #83: Huawei szykuje rewolucję w fotografii mobilnej

Azjatech to cotygodniowy przegląd najważniejszych informacji o innowacjach i technologii w krajach Azji, tworzony przez zespół analityków Instytutu Boyma we współpracy z Polskim Towarzystwem Wspierania Przedsiębiorczości.

Indonezja jako promotor demokracji – spójność wizerunku

Artykuł jest polskojęzyczną i skróconą wersją artykułu: Democracy in Indonesian Strategic Narratives. A New Framework of Coherence Analysis, Journal of Current Southeast Asian Affairs 2020, no. 2.

Tydzień w Azji #159: Bliscy sojusznicy USA milczą w sprawie Ukrainy

Przegląd Tygodnia w Azji to zbiór najważniejszych informacji ze świata polityki i gospodarki państw azjatyckich mijającego tygodnia, tworzony przez analityków Instytutu Boyma we współpracy z Polskim Towarzystwem Wspierania Przedsiębiorczości.

The Boym Institute message to Indian policymakers and analysts

India’s current position towards the Russian invasion on Ukraine may damage its reputation as a major force of peace in the world

USA-Iran: wojna czy pokój?

Dlaczego od prawie 40 lat Teheran i Waszyngton nie potrafią wypracować modus vivendi? Czy istnieje realne ryzyko wybuchu irańsko-amerykańskiej wojny? Serdecznie zapraszamy na dyskusję o stosunkach irańsko-amerykańskich do biura WeWork przy ul. Kruczej 50 w poniedziałek 4 listopada o godz. 18:00.

RP : Indie – widzialna ręka regulatora, czyli na co uważać na rynku gier video

W ciągu ostatnich lat wraz z dynamicznym rozwojem indyjskiego rynku cyfrowego, równie szybko zmieniają się regulacje rządzące rynkiem. Ucząc się na doświadczeniach dużych graczy, przedsiębiorcy mogą przygotować się przynajmniej na niektóre wyzwania.

Transport kolejowy drobnicy z Chin – Webinar Morskiej Agencji Gdynia

Potrzeba coraz szybszego sprowadzenia towaru z Chin w rozsądnej cenie to częste wyzwanie importerów. Jak nie wypaść z rynku i jak skutecznie na nim zaistnieć – podpowiadamy, jak transport kolejowy z Chiny może w tym pomóc i dlaczego nie należy się go bać.

„Przywództwo” w organizacjach regionalnych: relacja między interesami a tożsamością kolektywną – projekt Anny Grzywacz

Z radością informujemy, iż analityczka Instytutu Boyma dr Anna Grzywacz została zwyciężczynią finansowanego przez Narodowe Centrum Nauki konkursu Miniatura 4.

RP: Uzbeckie władze odkrywają plany w zakresie rozwoju energetyki wodnej

Uzbekistan szczególne nadzieje wiąże z energetyką wodną. Może to być szansa dla polskich firm z branży.

Tydzień w Azji #142: Polskie firmy celują w Azję Centralną. Pandemia im nie przeszkadza

Przegląd Tygodnia w Azji to zbiór najważniejszych informacji ze świata polityki i gospodarki państw azjatyckich mijającego tygodnia, tworzony przez analityków Instytutu Boyma we współpracy z Polskim Towarzystwem Wspierania Przedsiębiorczości.

Azjatech #114: Miasto-państwo buduje światową stolicę innowacji

Azjatech to cotygodniowy przegląd najważniejszych informacji o innowacjach i technologii w krajach Azji, tworzony przez zespół analityków Instytutu Boyma we współpracy z Polskim Towarzystwem Wspierania Przedsiębiorczości.