Analizy

The Dasgupta Review on Women and the Environmental Crisis

Commissioned in 2019 by the British government and published in February 2021, The Dasgupta Review has been likened to the 2006 Stern Review. Where the latter brought to widespread attention the many failings of the world economy in the face of global warming, the former makes similar points as regards biodiversity – and identifies the unique challenges faced by women.

Instytut Boyma 22.04.2021

Commissioned in 2019 by the British government and published in February 2021, The Dasgupta Review has been likened to the 2006 Stern Review. Where the latter brought to widespread attention the many failings of the world economy in the face of global warming, the former makes similar points as regards biodiversity – and identifies the unique challenges faced by women.

As a leading expert on the intersections between human welfare, population ethics, development, and the environment, Partha Dasgupta – the University of Cambridge Professor Emeritus of Economics and the author of many acclaimed publications for the academic and the general reader alike – was a natural fit for the task of revisiting the way we conceive of the relationship between the economy and the ecosystem. With the benefit of fifteen years’ worth of researching – and living through – the decline in the habitability of the planet since the Stern Review came out, The Economics of Biodiversity: The Dasgupta Review (“the Review”) makes an even more urgent case for changing the way we measure economic success in order to improve humanity’s prospects in the face of the escalating biodiversity crisis, and indeed of climate change as well.

I do not attempt to summarise all or even most of the key points raised by the Review. Among its many insights and recommendations, the Review highlights the circumstances and contributions of women, and it is this more targeted focus that is the scope of this article.

Early on in the Preface, Dasgupta refers to his reader with feminine pronouns: “the person reading the Review is doing so because she wants to understand our place in Nature as a citizen.… Depending on the context, I call her the ‘social evaluator’, or the ‘citizen investor’” (Dasgupta 2021: 4; all subsequent quotations refer to this work). Throughout the Review, the challenges faced by women and girls in the Global South are repeatedly noted and emphasised, bringing to the fore what is often kept in the far background of discussions and decision-making processes.

In the world’s poorest rural regions, necessary daily activities such as collecting water, gathering firewood, picking fruit, berries, and herbs, and food preparation, take many hours, with much of this work performed by women. For instance, rural women in Bangladesh “have been found to spend 50-55% of their day cooking” (37). These circumstances tend to be exacerbated if the local environment has deteriorated, thus reducing availability of many resources, or prolonging the time needed to acquire them. It has been shown that healthy forest ecosystems provide important hydrological services, including water purification as well as flood and drought mitigation, thus contributing to human well-being. For example, upstream forests improve baseflow, thus reducing “the time needed by women and children to collect drinking water” (67). Minority and economically disadvantaged communities are disproportionately exposed to low environmental quality and high environmental hazard from pollution that “degrade[s] natural ecosystems and directly harm[s] human health” (374).

Gender and income inequality can undermine sustainability; conversely, including women in decision-making, as is the case with forest management in India and Nepal, leads to “better resource governance and conservation outcomes” (375). In Jordan, Dasgupta notes, participation of indigenous and underrepresented communities in managing local ecosystems has led to positive results: “the sites have improved environmentally and socially: tribal conflicts over natural resources have reduced, grazing is better managed, and biodiversity has revived” (451).

Despite reluctance in some quarters to engage with the fraught problem of (over)population, the Review states plainly that “[e]xpanding human numbers have had significant implications on our global footprint” (491). A crucial issue is that of fertility decisions. In certain cultures these decisions are routinely taken at the level of the household (variously defined), with the woman’s perspective subsumed within the group she belongs to. Societal mores determine the value placed on fertility, with reproductive success often seen as a way of acquiring social status, despite the strains it can place on available resources. Conformity to social preferences may lead to a community engaging in a self-sustaining mode of behaviour that results in high fertility and low living standards, even if there is another self-sustaining mode “characterised by low fertility and rising living standards which is preferred by all” (241). Conformist preferences on both the individual and the social level can evolve for several reasons, not least through access to information from the outside world that challenges traditional practices. Where these practices now run counter to modern-day interests but may have had a sound rationale in the past, they may still be maintained despite circumstances having changed, resulting in communities that can “remain stuck” in modes of behaviour that are not in fact desired by nor are in the best interest of those who engage in them (243).

A universally recognised way of bringing fertility rates down is better educational opportunities. Education “makes a break with tradition” by delaying marriage, leading to better birth spacing and improving economic prospects (243). However, despite being seen as the “surest route to woman’s empowerment” by all governments, full benefits of education have so far failed to materialise: in low income countries as much as 30% of girls and young women are illiterate. The Review therefore recommends complementing education with a faster and more affordable solution to high fertility rates, that is, family planning programmes. Regrettably, these tend to “remain low on the development agenda” (244), despite their achievements. In the 1960s and 1980s subsidised contraceptives have successfully accelerated fertility declines in Asia and Latin America. Their potential for averting deaths in developing countries has been estimated at 30% for maternal deaths and nearly 10% for childhood deaths, while satisfying unmet needs for modern contraception in developing countries might lead to a 68% decline in unwanted pregnancies. The track record of family planning is positive all-round: in addition to better birth-spacing and lower child mortality, it leads to better educated children, larger household assets, and greater use of healthcare. The Review states in no uncertain terms: “investment in community-based family planning programmes should now be regarded as essential” (244). If this recommendation is heeded, in Africa alone the population would be “some 1 billion smaller in 2100 than is currently projected” (247).

These lessons are not irrelevant to the 1.2 billion people in high-income countries. It is there, in societies with the heaviest environmental demands of all, that individual decisions regarding fertility have the largest impact – and come at (relatively) little personal cost. The Review emphasises that given the social nature of humans, reconfiguring the values that currently govern our perception of living at the intersection of population, consumption, and environment may be easier than thought and “the cost of necessary social change is probably much less than is feared” (247). The contemporary economic paradigm beholden to relentless extractivism and rampant consumptionism that governs modern societies is hardly inevitable: transforming the values we live by to ensure human thriving within the richness of planet’s biodiversity is not only possible, but imperative. Foregrounding the role and contribution of women is one of the key components of that transformation.

At the end of the day, it all comes down to recognising that change can happen either while the humanity can still be at least partly in charge of it, thus ensuring as much fairness as possible – or it can be enforced by circumstances, when it’s already too late to meaningfully adjust the course of events.

Niniejszy materiał znajdą Państwo w Kwartalniku Boyma nr – 7/2021

Przypisy:

References:

Dasgupta, Partha. (2021) The Economics of Biodiversity: The Dasgupta Review. London: HM Treasury.

Dawid Juraszek

Ekspert ds. globalnych problemów środowiskowych. Autor książki "Antropocen dla początkujących. Klimat, środowisko, pandemie w epoce człowieka". Doktorant Uniwersytetu w Maastricht (ekokrytyka poznawcza), absolwent filologii angielskiej, przywództwa w oświacie, zarządzania środowiskiem i stosunków międzynarodowych. Pisał m.in. dla Dwutygodnika, Liberté!, Krytyki Politycznej, Gazety Wyborczej, Polityki, Newsweeka, Ha!artu, Lampy, Focusa Historia, Podróży i Poznaj Świat, a także dla licznych publikacji w Stanach Zjednoczonych, Wielkiej Brytanii, Australii, Kanadzie, Irlandii i Nowej Zelandii. Od kilkunastu lat pracuje w chińskim szkolnictwie wyższym.

czytaj więcej

Tydzień w Azji: 30-lecie chińskiego uczestnictwa w misjach pokojowych ONZ – analiza podejścia i motywacji Pekinu

Z ponad 2500 błękitnymi hełmami obecnie w służbie czynnej, z tym 13 na kluczowych stanowiskach dowódczych, Państwo Środka jest najliczniejszym uczestnikiem misji pokojowych ONZ spośród stałych członków RB ONZ. 

Tydzień w Azji #185: Strajk, długi i zablokowane przejęcie. Korea ratuje przemysł stoczniowy

Przegląd Tygodnia w Azji to zbiór najważniejszych informacji ze świata polityki i gospodarki państw azjatyckich mijającego tygodnia, tworzony przez analityków Instytutu Boyma we współpracy z Polskim Towarzystwem Wspierania Przedsiębiorczości.

Tydzień w Azji: Japonia – walka z epidemią w wydaniu „soft”

16 kwietnia premier Shinzo Abe rozszerzył wprowadzony 7 kwietnia stan zagrożenia z siedmiu najludniejszych prefektur na całą Japonię. Aby stan zagrożenia zakończył się planowo 6 maja, wprowadzone środki społecznego dystansu powinny ograniczyć społeczne interakcje o 70% i spłaszczyć krzywą zachorowań.

RP: Czas na biogaz. Globalnie

Trwający kryzys energetyczny to olbrzymie wyzwanie dla poszczególnych przedsiębiorstw i całych gospodarek, także polskiej i rodzimych firm. Może on jednak stać się szansą na rozwój nowych technologii i rynków.

The strategic imperatives driving ASEAN-EU free trade talks: colliding values as an obstacle

Recently revived talks aimed at the conclusion of an inter-regional free trade agreement between the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) and the European Union (EU) are driven by strategic imperatives of both regions.

Tydzień w Azji #207: Chiny wkroczyły w Rok Królika. Nadzieja na nowe otwarcie

Przegląd Tygodnia w Azji to zbiór najważniejszych informacji ze świata polityki i gospodarki państw azjatyckich mijającego tygodnia, tworzony przez analityków Instytutu Boyma we współpracy z Polskim Towarzystwem Wspierania Przedsiębiorczości.

Historia sukcesu? 30-lecie kazachskiej państwowości i wyzwania na przyszłość

Jak z tymi wyzwaniami poradzi sobie Kazachstan? Jaki może być udział Polski i Unii Europejskiej w kolejnym kazachskim skoku rozwojowym? Jakie szanse znajdzie tam dla siebie nasz biznes? 

Azjatech #230: Cyfrowa i mobilna klinika ma ułatwić dostęp do służby zdrowia w Indiach

Azjatech to cotygodniowy przegląd najważniejszych informacji o innowacjach i technologii w krajach Azji, tworzony przez zespół analityków Instytutu Boyma we współpracy z Polskim Towarzystwem Wspierania Przedsiębiorczości.

Wojna w Ukrainie. Co oznacza dla Azji Centralnej?

24 lutego Rosja rozpoczęła pełnoskalową wojnę przeciw Ukrainie. Moment ten można uznać za początek końca istniejącego porządku światowego. Azja Centralna jest regionem wrażliwym na zmiany geopolityczne. Od trzech dekad ścierają się tu wpływy Chin, Rosji, Iranu i Zachodu.

Forbes: Jak Chińczycy podbijają kosmos

Komunistyczna Partia Chin konsekwentnie realizuje plany podboju kosmosu nakreślone jeszcze przez przewodniczącego Mao Zedonga. Po wdrożeniu własnego systemu nawigacji satelitarnej BeiDou, pobraniu próbek z Księżyca na statku Chang’e 5 i wejściu w orbitę Marsa sondy w ramach misji Tianwen-1 przyszedł czas na wisienkę na torcie: budowę nowej chińskiej stacji kosmicznej.

Chińscy katolicy wychodzą z cienia? Starania Watykanu o zjednoczenie Kościoła

Kiedy w 1989 r. papież Jan Paweł II leciał z wizytą do Korei Południowej, władze chińskie nie zezwoliły na przelot nad terytorium Chińskiej Republiki Ludowej. Papieski samolot musiał wydłużyć trasę przez sowiecką przestrzeń powietrzną. Wielokrotnie podkreślane przez Ojca Świętego pragnienie nawiązania relacji Kościoła z Pekinem i przekucie jej w konkretne formy współpracy zatrzymało się na etapie nieoficjalnych działań na płaszczyźnie dyplomatycznej. 25 lat później Franciszek jako pierwszy w historii papież wysłał telegram z pozdrowieniami dla przywódcy Chin z pokładu samolotu przelatującego nad ChRL.

Tydzień w Azji #233: Ten kraj balansuje między Rosją a Zachodem. Teraz wchodzą tu Chiny

Przegląd Tygodnia w Azji to zbiór najważniejszych informacji ze świata polityki i gospodarki państw azjatyckich mijającego tygodnia, tworzony przez analityków Instytutu Boyma we współpracy z Polskim Towarzystwem Wspierania Przedsiębiorczości.

Słońce made in China – energia przyszłości

Energia pochodząca z reakcji termojądrowej (fuzji jądrowej) mogłaby zasilić miliony gospodarstw domowych nie emitując przy tym produktów ubocznych takich jak tlenek węgla, azotu, siarki, pyły, popiół itd . Dlatego naukowcy pracujący przy udoskonalaniu projektu podkładają w nim wielkie nadzieje.

Tydzień w Azji: Kirgistan na drodze politycznej stabilizacji

10 stycznia odbyły się w Kirgistanie przyspieszone wybory prezydenckie (...) Atmosfera społeczna tego głosowania pozostawała wciąż napięta, od momentu ogłoszenia wyników październikowych wyborów, w których żadne ugrupowanie opozycyjne nie zdobyło nawet jednego mandatu poselskiego.

The Boym Institute message to Indian policymakers and analysts

India’s current position towards the Russian invasion on Ukraine may damage its reputation as a major force of peace in the world

Azja Centralna – czy pandemia ma szansę wzmocnić regionalne spoiwa?

Czy okres bezpośrednio poprzedzający pandemię COVID-19 pozwolił na wykształcenie się trwałego trendu na współpracę wewnątrzregionalną, który miałby szanse ulec wzmocnieniu w konsekwencji pandemii?

Tydzień w Azji #154: „Powstanie styczniowe” w Kazachstanie jest groźne dla uranu, ropy, gazu i bitcoina

Przegląd Tygodnia w Azji to zbiór najważniejszych informacji ze świata polityki i gospodarki państw azjatyckich mijającego tygodnia, tworzony przez analityków Instytutu Boyma we współpracy z Polskim Towarzystwem Wspierania Przedsiębiorczości.

Ratując ludzi czy swój wizerunek? Narracje o porządku humanitarnym w Azji Południowo-Wschodniej.

(Subiektywny) przegląd wybranych artykułów badawczych dotyczących stosunków międzynarodowych w regionie Azji i Pacyfiku publikowanych w wiodących czasopismach naukowych.

Forbes: Wielka Brytania po brexicie chce wrócić na Pacyfik

W przeszłości Wielka Brytania dominowała nad wodami i wybrzeżami Indopacyfiku jako kolonialne imperium, nad którym nigdy nie zachodziło słońce. (...) Dzisiaj, już po definitywnym opuszczeniu Unii Europejskiej, poszukując nowej roli na arenie międzynarodowej Wielka Brytania stara się wrócić na Indopacyfik

Paweł Behrendt dla RMF 24 o wizycie Pelosi na Tajwanie: Ma olbrzymie znaczenie symboliczne

Serdecznie zapraszamy do odsłuchania zapisu rozmowy analityka Instytutu Boyma Pawła Behrendta, który w rozmowie z dziennikarzem RMF FM Michałem Zielińskim skomentował wizytę Nancy Pelosi na Tajwanie.

Azjatech #159: Australia zyska nowe centrum badań i rozwoju nad lekami antywirusowymi

Azjatech to cotygodniowy przegląd najważniejszych informacji o innowacjach i technologii w krajach Azji, tworzony przez zespół analityków Instytutu Boyma we współpracy z Polskim Towarzystwem Wspierania Przedsiębiorczości.

Kwadryga na Indopacyfiku – ani sojusz, ani efemeryda

Czterostronna współpraca Japonii, Australii, Indii i Stanów Zjednoczonych znana jest jako Czterostronny Dialog w dziedzinie Bezpieczeństwa. Wedle założeń projektu, Japonia, USA, Australia i Indie miałyby tworzyć azjatycką oś pokoju, a dialog wzmacniać istniejące bilateralne i trilateralne formaty współpracy między nimi. 

Patrycja Pendrakowska na seminarium „17 plus czy minus 1: o współpracy Europy Środkowej z Chinami”

Wydarzenie odbędzie się w formule on-line za pośrednictwem platformy Zoom, w środę 16 grudnia o godzinie 12:00.

Azjatech #189: Zimna wojna rozszerza się. Czy USA zakażą chińskich usług w chmurze?

Azjatech to cotygodniowy przegląd najważniejszych informacji o innowacjach i technologii w krajach Azji, tworzony przez zespół analityków Instytutu Boyma we współpracy z Polskim Towarzystwem Wspierania Przedsiębiorczości.