Analizy

The Dasgupta Review on Women and the Environmental Crisis

Commissioned in 2019 by the British government and published in February 2021, The Dasgupta Review has been likened to the 2006 Stern Review. Where the latter brought to widespread attention the many failings of the world economy in the face of global warming, the former makes similar points as regards biodiversity – and identifies the unique challenges faced by women.

Instytut Boyma 22.04.2021

Commissioned in 2019 by the British government and published in February 2021, The Dasgupta Review has been likened to the 2006 Stern Review. Where the latter brought to widespread attention the many failings of the world economy in the face of global warming, the former makes similar points as regards biodiversity – and identifies the unique challenges faced by women.

As a leading expert on the intersections between human welfare, population ethics, development, and the environment, Partha Dasgupta – the University of Cambridge Professor Emeritus of Economics and the author of many acclaimed publications for the academic and the general reader alike – was a natural fit for the task of revisiting the way we conceive of the relationship between the economy and the ecosystem. With the benefit of fifteen years’ worth of researching – and living through – the decline in the habitability of the planet since the Stern Review came out, The Economics of Biodiversity: The Dasgupta Review (“the Review”) makes an even more urgent case for changing the way we measure economic success in order to improve humanity’s prospects in the face of the escalating biodiversity crisis, and indeed of climate change as well.

I do not attempt to summarise all or even most of the key points raised by the Review. Among its many insights and recommendations, the Review highlights the circumstances and contributions of women, and it is this more targeted focus that is the scope of this article.

Early on in the Preface, Dasgupta refers to his reader with feminine pronouns: “the person reading the Review is doing so because she wants to understand our place in Nature as a citizen.… Depending on the context, I call her the ‘social evaluator’, or the ‘citizen investor’” (Dasgupta 2021: 4; all subsequent quotations refer to this work). Throughout the Review, the challenges faced by women and girls in the Global South are repeatedly noted and emphasised, bringing to the fore what is often kept in the far background of discussions and decision-making processes.

In the world’s poorest rural regions, necessary daily activities such as collecting water, gathering firewood, picking fruit, berries, and herbs, and food preparation, take many hours, with much of this work performed by women. For instance, rural women in Bangladesh “have been found to spend 50-55% of their day cooking” (37). These circumstances tend to be exacerbated if the local environment has deteriorated, thus reducing availability of many resources, or prolonging the time needed to acquire them. It has been shown that healthy forest ecosystems provide important hydrological services, including water purification as well as flood and drought mitigation, thus contributing to human well-being. For example, upstream forests improve baseflow, thus reducing “the time needed by women and children to collect drinking water” (67). Minority and economically disadvantaged communities are disproportionately exposed to low environmental quality and high environmental hazard from pollution that “degrade[s] natural ecosystems and directly harm[s] human health” (374).

Gender and income inequality can undermine sustainability; conversely, including women in decision-making, as is the case with forest management in India and Nepal, leads to “better resource governance and conservation outcomes” (375). In Jordan, Dasgupta notes, participation of indigenous and underrepresented communities in managing local ecosystems has led to positive results: “the sites have improved environmentally and socially: tribal conflicts over natural resources have reduced, grazing is better managed, and biodiversity has revived” (451).

Despite reluctance in some quarters to engage with the fraught problem of (over)population, the Review states plainly that “[e]xpanding human numbers have had significant implications on our global footprint” (491). A crucial issue is that of fertility decisions. In certain cultures these decisions are routinely taken at the level of the household (variously defined), with the woman’s perspective subsumed within the group she belongs to. Societal mores determine the value placed on fertility, with reproductive success often seen as a way of acquiring social status, despite the strains it can place on available resources. Conformity to social preferences may lead to a community engaging in a self-sustaining mode of behaviour that results in high fertility and low living standards, even if there is another self-sustaining mode “characterised by low fertility and rising living standards which is preferred by all” (241). Conformist preferences on both the individual and the social level can evolve for several reasons, not least through access to information from the outside world that challenges traditional practices. Where these practices now run counter to modern-day interests but may have had a sound rationale in the past, they may still be maintained despite circumstances having changed, resulting in communities that can “remain stuck” in modes of behaviour that are not in fact desired by nor are in the best interest of those who engage in them (243).

A universally recognised way of bringing fertility rates down is better educational opportunities. Education “makes a break with tradition” by delaying marriage, leading to better birth spacing and improving economic prospects (243). However, despite being seen as the “surest route to woman’s empowerment” by all governments, full benefits of education have so far failed to materialise: in low income countries as much as 30% of girls and young women are illiterate. The Review therefore recommends complementing education with a faster and more affordable solution to high fertility rates, that is, family planning programmes. Regrettably, these tend to “remain low on the development agenda” (244), despite their achievements. In the 1960s and 1980s subsidised contraceptives have successfully accelerated fertility declines in Asia and Latin America. Their potential for averting deaths in developing countries has been estimated at 30% for maternal deaths and nearly 10% for childhood deaths, while satisfying unmet needs for modern contraception in developing countries might lead to a 68% decline in unwanted pregnancies. The track record of family planning is positive all-round: in addition to better birth-spacing and lower child mortality, it leads to better educated children, larger household assets, and greater use of healthcare. The Review states in no uncertain terms: “investment in community-based family planning programmes should now be regarded as essential” (244). If this recommendation is heeded, in Africa alone the population would be “some 1 billion smaller in 2100 than is currently projected” (247).

These lessons are not irrelevant to the 1.2 billion people in high-income countries. It is there, in societies with the heaviest environmental demands of all, that individual decisions regarding fertility have the largest impact – and come at (relatively) little personal cost. The Review emphasises that given the social nature of humans, reconfiguring the values that currently govern our perception of living at the intersection of population, consumption, and environment may be easier than thought and “the cost of necessary social change is probably much less than is feared” (247). The contemporary economic paradigm beholden to relentless extractivism and rampant consumptionism that governs modern societies is hardly inevitable: transforming the values we live by to ensure human thriving within the richness of planet’s biodiversity is not only possible, but imperative. Foregrounding the role and contribution of women is one of the key components of that transformation.

At the end of the day, it all comes down to recognising that change can happen either while the humanity can still be at least partly in charge of it, thus ensuring as much fairness as possible – or it can be enforced by circumstances, when it’s already too late to meaningfully adjust the course of events.

Niniejszy materiał znajdą Państwo w Kwartalniku Boyma nr – 7/2021

Przypisy:

References:

Dasgupta, Partha. (2021) The Economics of Biodiversity: The Dasgupta Review. London: HM Treasury.

Dawid Juraszek

Ekspert ds. globalnych problemów środowiskowych. Pisarz, poeta, publicysta, wieloletni wykładowca w chińskim szkolnictwie wyższym. Doktorant Uniwersytetu w Maastricht, absolwent filologii angielskiej, przywództwa w oświacie, zarządzania środowiskiem i stosunków międzynarodowych. Poza Polską publikował w USA, Wielkiej Brytanii, Kanadzie i Australii.

czytaj więcej

Patrycja Pendrakowska dla Observer Research Foundation o okolicznościach przebiegu pandemii koronawirusa w Polsce

W swoim artykule Patrycja Pendrakowska opisuje polityczne i gospodarcze okoliczności przebiegu pandemii koronawirusa w Polsce.

To nasza wojna. Co dalej po klęsce w Afganistanie?

Polacy byli w Afganistanie przez prawie 19 lat. Zaangażowaliśmy wiele środków, ponieśliśmy duże straty. Teraz musimy skupić się w pierwszym rzędzie na ograniczeniu skutków katastrofy i znalezieniu jej przyczyn.

Dlaczego Ormianie są przekonani, że to Azerowie jako pierwsi zaatakowali Górski Karabach?

27 września po raz kolejny wybuchły poważne starcia w Górskim Karabachu, co można już nazwać wojną na dużą skalę. (...) W tym artykule chcę przedstawić fakty i analizy, które udowodnią, że to Azerbejdżanowi było na rękę zaatakować Górski Karabach (Arcach). 

Forbes: Kto i za ile tworzy rynek fitness w Indiach

Joga czy tradycyjna medycyna ajurwedyjska cieszą się ogromną popularnością w Indiach i na całym świecie. Obecnie tradycyjne praktyki i ćwiczenia wzajemnie przenikają się z nowoczesnymi, tworząc podwaliny pod prężnie rozwijający się sektor fitness

Korea Północna w walce z COVID-19

Rząd Korei Północnej nie przywykł do tego, by się tłumaczyć światu zewnętrznemu ze swoich działań. Według oficjalnej propagandy, jak do tej pory w KRLD nie było żadnej ofiary śmiertelnej spowodowanej głośnym wirusem COVID-19. (...) Milczenie Pjongjangu nie oznacza jednak, że nie wiemy nic na temat tego co się dzieje.

Nowe studia magisterskie na Uniwersytecie Warszawskim: Komunikacja międzykulturowa – Azja i Afryka

Nowy kierunek na studiach magisterskich UW, który serdecznie polecamy.

Tydzień w Azji #55: Euroazjatyckie tournée Mike’a Pompeo

Przegląd Tygodnia w Azji to zbiór najważniejszych informacji ze świata polityki i gospodarki państw azjatyckich mijającego tygodnia, tworzony przez analityków Instytutu Boyma we współpracy z Polskim Towarzystwem Wspierania Przedsiębiorczości.

Tydzień w Azji #61: #TydzieńwAzji pod znakiem ratowania gospodarki. Jakie pakiety od rządów?

Przegląd Tygodnia w Azji to zbiór najważniejszych informacji ze świata polityki i gospodarki państw azjatyckich mijającego tygodnia, tworzony przez analityków Instytutu Boyma we współpracy z Polskim Towarzystwem Wspierania Przedsiębiorczości.

Dr Krzysztof Zalewski uczestnikiem Kigali Global Dialogue w Rwandzie

Krótka notatka i galeria zdjęć od przewodniczącego rady Fundacji Instytut Boyma, który przebywa w Rwandzie na konferencji "Kigali Global Dialogue".

Tydzień w Azji: Indyjski rynek walentynkowy, czyli szybka westernizacja młodego pokolenia klasy średniej

14 lutego miliony ludzi na całym świecie celebrują święto zakochanych. Zgodnie z panującym zwyczajem tego dnia wysyła się kartki z wyznaniami miłosnymi, kwiaty oraz upominki. Indie pod tym względem nie są wyjątkiem...

Anna Grzywacz na konferencji pt. “Azja Południowo-Wschodnia jako region kontrastów – wyzwania i perspektywy”

Wydarzenie odbędzie się w formule on-line za pośrednictwem platformy Google Meet, w piątek 15 stycznia o godzinie 10:00.

Azjatech #109: Japońskie roboty przeprowadzają nawet 2500 testów PCR dziennie

Azjatech to cotygodniowy przegląd najważniejszych informacji o innowacjach i technologii w krajach Azji, tworzony przez zespół analityków Instytutu Boyma we współpracy z Polskim Towarzystwem Wspierania Przedsiębiorczości.

Centralnoazjatyckie gry wojenne

Prezentowane opracowanie ma na celu przybliżenie tematyki militarnego potencjału państw Azji Centralnej, zwłaszcza pod kątem rynku broni i inwestycji w modernizację sił zbrojnych. W opracowaniu dokonano analizy sytuacji militarnej poszczególnych republik, jak również przedstawiono zmiany jakie zachodziły w tym regionie wraz ze zmieniającymi się uwarunkowaniami geopolitycznymi od czasu upadku ZSRR.

Tydzień w Azji: Wyboista droga współpracy – Chiny eskalują napięcie w Azji Centralnej

Polityka ChRL wobec republik Azji Centralnej od wielu lat ukierunkowana jest na budowanie pozytywnych relacji, rozszerzanie współpracy w wielu obszarach i dbałość władz Państwa Środka o unikanie poczucia chińskiej dominacji wśród mieszkańców regionu...

Refleksje o szczycie 16+1 w Budapeszcie

Tegoroczny szczyt krajów Europy Środkowo-Wschodniej i Chin w Budapeszcie różnił się od poprzednich edycji na wielu poziomach — Chiny oraz Węgry prowadziły na nim bardzo aktywną politykę. Na forum biznesowym obecni byli jedynie Victor Orban i Li Keqiang – pozostałe głowy państw przebywały wtedy na zamku, gdzie odbywało się spotkanie premierów. Zaznaczmy, że w Rydze, […]

Tydzień w Azji #52: Szczyt 17+1 w Pekinie, czyli dlaczego polskie władze powinny tam pojechać

Przegląd Tygodnia w Azji to zbiór najważniejszych informacji ze świata polityki i gospodarki państw azjatyckich mijającego tygodnia, tworzony przez analityków Instytutu Boyma we współpracy z Polskim Towarzystwem Wspierania Przedsiębiorczości.

Krzysztof Zalewski dla portalu PolskieRadio24.pl o problemach gospodarczych w Azji Południowej

Informujemy, że nasz analityk dr Krzysztof Zalewski udzielił wywiadu dla portalu PolskieRadio24.pl. Tematem rozmowy były wywołane pandemią problemy gospodarcze krajów Azji Południowej.

Tydzień w Azji #71: Morski wyścig zbrojeń. Chiny jak Związek Radziecki?

Przegląd Tygodnia w Azji to zbiór najważniejszych informacji ze świata polityki i gospodarki państw azjatyckich mijającego tygodnia, tworzony przez analityków Instytutu Boyma we współpracy z Polskim Towarzystwem Wspierania Przedsiębiorczości.

Forbes: Klan nietykalnych, czyli ciemna strona południowokoreańskich czeboli

Szefowie Samsunga nie zawsze grali czysto. Zarówno syn jak i wnuk założyciela słynnego czebola mają na swoich kontach bogatą historię skandali gospodarczo-korupcyjnych, które za każdym razem mocno wstrząsały opinią publiczną.

„Obyś była matką tysiąca synów” – status kobiety w społeczeństwie indyjskim

Konstytucja Indii z 1950 roku wprowadziła zasadę równości szans płci, która przyznaje kobietom i mężczyznom takie same prawa w życiu rodzinnym, politycznym, społecznym i gospodarczym. Dlaczego zatem prawie czterdzieści procent dziewczynek w wieku 15-17 lat nie uczęszcza do szkół, wciąż kultywuje się zwyczaj przekazywania posagu a prenatalna selekcja płci to nadal ogromny społeczny problem?

W jakim zakresie zmienił się charakter międzynarodowego zaangażowania w wojny domowe po 1989 roku?

Od końca drugiej wojny światowej to wojny domowe, a nie międzypaństwowe konflikty, stały się dominującą i najbardziej wyniszczającą formą zorganizowanej przemocy w ramach systemu międzynarodowego. Jak zmieniła się ich charakterystyka na przestrzeni lat?

Women’s liberation in China: interview with prof. Wu Lijuan

Interview of Ewelina Horoszkiewicz with prof. Wu Lijuan - Associate Professor at the Department of Sociology at Peking University. Her research concentrates on the gender issues and social changes brought about by globalization. She wrote a book “Job Placements and Job Shifts in China: The Effects of Education, Family Background and Gender”.

Tydzień w Azji #66: Koronawirus oznacza trzeci rok recesji dla irańskiej gospodarki

Przegląd Tygodnia w Azji to zbiór najważniejszych informacji ze świata polityki i gospodarki państw azjatyckich mijającego tygodnia, tworzony przez analityków Instytutu Boyma we współpracy z Polskim Towarzystwem Wspierania Przedsiębiorczości.

Tydzień w Azji #133: Niemiecka fregata Bayern budzi emocje Pekinu

Przegląd Tygodnia w Azji to zbiór najważniejszych informacji ze świata polityki i gospodarki państw azjatyckich mijającego tygodnia, tworzony przez analityków Instytutu Boyma we współpracy z Polskim Towarzystwem Wspierania Przedsiębiorczości.