Analizy

The Dasgupta Review on Women and the Environmental Crisis

Commissioned in 2019 by the British government and published in February 2021, The Dasgupta Review has been likened to the 2006 Stern Review. Where the latter brought to widespread attention the many failings of the world economy in the face of global warming, the former makes similar points as regards biodiversity – and identifies the unique challenges faced by women.

Instytut Boyma 22.04.2021

Commissioned in 2019 by the British government and published in February 2021, The Dasgupta Review has been likened to the 2006 Stern Review. Where the latter brought to widespread attention the many failings of the world economy in the face of global warming, the former makes similar points as regards biodiversity – and identifies the unique challenges faced by women.

As a leading expert on the intersections between human welfare, population ethics, development, and the environment, Partha Dasgupta – the University of Cambridge Professor Emeritus of Economics and the author of many acclaimed publications for the academic and the general reader alike – was a natural fit for the task of revisiting the way we conceive of the relationship between the economy and the ecosystem. With the benefit of fifteen years’ worth of researching – and living through – the decline in the habitability of the planet since the Stern Review came out, The Economics of Biodiversity: The Dasgupta Review (“the Review”) makes an even more urgent case for changing the way we measure economic success in order to improve humanity’s prospects in the face of the escalating biodiversity crisis, and indeed of climate change as well.

I do not attempt to summarise all or even most of the key points raised by the Review. Among its many insights and recommendations, the Review highlights the circumstances and contributions of women, and it is this more targeted focus that is the scope of this article.

Early on in the Preface, Dasgupta refers to his reader with feminine pronouns: “the person reading the Review is doing so because she wants to understand our place in Nature as a citizen.… Depending on the context, I call her the ‘social evaluator’, or the ‘citizen investor’” (Dasgupta 2021: 4; all subsequent quotations refer to this work). Throughout the Review, the challenges faced by women and girls in the Global South are repeatedly noted and emphasised, bringing to the fore what is often kept in the far background of discussions and decision-making processes.

In the world’s poorest rural regions, necessary daily activities such as collecting water, gathering firewood, picking fruit, berries, and herbs, and food preparation, take many hours, with much of this work performed by women. For instance, rural women in Bangladesh “have been found to spend 50-55% of their day cooking” (37). These circumstances tend to be exacerbated if the local environment has deteriorated, thus reducing availability of many resources, or prolonging the time needed to acquire them. It has been shown that healthy forest ecosystems provide important hydrological services, including water purification as well as flood and drought mitigation, thus contributing to human well-being. For example, upstream forests improve baseflow, thus reducing “the time needed by women and children to collect drinking water” (67). Minority and economically disadvantaged communities are disproportionately exposed to low environmental quality and high environmental hazard from pollution that “degrade[s] natural ecosystems and directly harm[s] human health” (374).

Gender and income inequality can undermine sustainability; conversely, including women in decision-making, as is the case with forest management in India and Nepal, leads to “better resource governance and conservation outcomes” (375). In Jordan, Dasgupta notes, participation of indigenous and underrepresented communities in managing local ecosystems has led to positive results: “the sites have improved environmentally and socially: tribal conflicts over natural resources have reduced, grazing is better managed, and biodiversity has revived” (451).

Despite reluctance in some quarters to engage with the fraught problem of (over)population, the Review states plainly that “[e]xpanding human numbers have had significant implications on our global footprint” (491). A crucial issue is that of fertility decisions. In certain cultures these decisions are routinely taken at the level of the household (variously defined), with the woman’s perspective subsumed within the group she belongs to. Societal mores determine the value placed on fertility, with reproductive success often seen as a way of acquiring social status, despite the strains it can place on available resources. Conformity to social preferences may lead to a community engaging in a self-sustaining mode of behaviour that results in high fertility and low living standards, even if there is another self-sustaining mode “characterised by low fertility and rising living standards which is preferred by all” (241). Conformist preferences on both the individual and the social level can evolve for several reasons, not least through access to information from the outside world that challenges traditional practices. Where these practices now run counter to modern-day interests but may have had a sound rationale in the past, they may still be maintained despite circumstances having changed, resulting in communities that can “remain stuck” in modes of behaviour that are not in fact desired by nor are in the best interest of those who engage in them (243).

A universally recognised way of bringing fertility rates down is better educational opportunities. Education “makes a break with tradition” by delaying marriage, leading to better birth spacing and improving economic prospects (243). However, despite being seen as the “surest route to woman’s empowerment” by all governments, full benefits of education have so far failed to materialise: in low income countries as much as 30% of girls and young women are illiterate. The Review therefore recommends complementing education with a faster and more affordable solution to high fertility rates, that is, family planning programmes. Regrettably, these tend to “remain low on the development agenda” (244), despite their achievements. In the 1960s and 1980s subsidised contraceptives have successfully accelerated fertility declines in Asia and Latin America. Their potential for averting deaths in developing countries has been estimated at 30% for maternal deaths and nearly 10% for childhood deaths, while satisfying unmet needs for modern contraception in developing countries might lead to a 68% decline in unwanted pregnancies. The track record of family planning is positive all-round: in addition to better birth-spacing and lower child mortality, it leads to better educated children, larger household assets, and greater use of healthcare. The Review states in no uncertain terms: “investment in community-based family planning programmes should now be regarded as essential” (244). If this recommendation is heeded, in Africa alone the population would be “some 1 billion smaller in 2100 than is currently projected” (247).

These lessons are not irrelevant to the 1.2 billion people in high-income countries. It is there, in societies with the heaviest environmental demands of all, that individual decisions regarding fertility have the largest impact – and come at (relatively) little personal cost. The Review emphasises that given the social nature of humans, reconfiguring the values that currently govern our perception of living at the intersection of population, consumption, and environment may be easier than thought and “the cost of necessary social change is probably much less than is feared” (247). The contemporary economic paradigm beholden to relentless extractivism and rampant consumptionism that governs modern societies is hardly inevitable: transforming the values we live by to ensure human thriving within the richness of planet’s biodiversity is not only possible, but imperative. Foregrounding the role and contribution of women is one of the key components of that transformation.

At the end of the day, it all comes down to recognising that change can happen either while the humanity can still be at least partly in charge of it, thus ensuring as much fairness as possible – or it can be enforced by circumstances, when it’s already too late to meaningfully adjust the course of events.

Niniejszy materiał znajdą Państwo w Kwartalniku Boyma nr – 7/2021

Przypisy:

References:

Dasgupta, Partha. (2021) The Economics of Biodiversity: The Dasgupta Review. London: HM Treasury.

Dawid Juraszek

Ekspert ds. globalnych problemów środowiskowych. Pisarz, poeta, publicysta, wieloletni wykładowca w chińskim szkolnictwie wyższym. Doktorant Uniwersytetu w Maastricht, absolwent filologii angielskiej, przywództwa w oświacie, zarządzania środowiskiem i stosunków międzynarodowych. Poza Polską publikował w USA, Wielkiej Brytanii, Kanadzie i Australii.

czytaj więcej

Historia sukcesu? 30-lecie kazachskiej państwowości i wyzwania na przyszłość

Jak z tymi wyzwaniami poradzi sobie Kazachstan? Jaki może być udział Polski i Unii Europejskiej w kolejnym kazachskim skoku rozwojowym? Jakie szanse znajdzie tam dla siebie nasz biznes? 

Tydzień w Azji #70: Współpraca w ASEAN, a nie izolacja, gwarancją bezpieczeństwa żywieniowego

Przegląd Tygodnia w Azji to zbiór najważniejszych informacji ze świata polityki i gospodarki państw azjatyckich, tworzony we współpracy z Polskim Towarzystwem Wspierania Przedsiębiorczości.

Instytut Boyma nawiązuje współpracę z Adam Institute for Democracy and Peace

Będziemy wspierać Adam Institute for Democracy and Peace z siedzibą w Jerozolimie w prowadzeniu warsztatów metodą Betzavta w Polsce. Więcej informacji o metodzie, a także pierwszych warsztatach Betzavta w Polsce o wolności słowa już wkrótce!

Azjatech #20: Czy miejskie niebo zapełni się taksówkami?

Azjatech to cotygodniowy przegląd najważniejszych informacji o innowacjach i technologii w krajach Azji, tworzony przez zespół analityków Instytutu Boyma we współpracy z Polskim Towarzystwem Wspierania Przedsiębiorczości.

Tydzień w Azji: Wielka migracja, czyli Rosja i Azja Centralna w obliczu koronawirusa

Czarne chmury gromadzą się nad milionami imigrantów zarobkowych w Rosji. Kryzys gospodarczy spowodowany koronawirusem i spadkiem ceny ropy uderzy mocno w główne źródła zatrudnienia ludności napływowej z republik Azji Centralnej

Zielony biznes, złoty interes

Kiedy poprzednim razem miałem okazję przyjrzeć się świadomości ekologicznej przyszłych chińskich przedsiębiorców, to, co zobaczyłem, nie było zachęcające. Wobec skali zagrożeń środowiskowych przed jakimi stoi ludzkość oraz faktu, że każdy, w tym biznes, musi przyłączyć się do wysiłków na rzecz ich zażegnania, powiem więcej: było zatrważające.

Tydzień w Azji: Awicenna, czyli uzbecki pomysł na turystykę w czasach zarazy

Turystyka po objęciu prezydentury przez Szawkata Mirzjojojewa została uznana za ważny dział gospodarki o niewykorzystanym dotąd potencjale. COVID-19 dodał do istniejących, strukturalnych problemów branży w Uzbekistanie kolejne wyzwania.

Fake newsy i farmy trolli – streszczenie spotkania

W dniu 17 grudnia br. w siedzibie Instytutu Boyma odbyła się autorska debata na podstawie reportaży wcieleniowych Anny Sobolewskiej i Katarzyny Pruszkiewicz. Dziennikarki przedstawiły w jaki sposób wygląda praca w przemyśle dezinformacji, a także wyjaśniły jak tworzenie manipulowanych i opłacanych wypowiedzi w Internecie może wpłynąć na opinię publiczną.

Development strategies for Ulaanbaatar according to the conception for the city’s 2040 General Development Plan – part 1

In the first part of this analysis of Ulaanbaatar’s winning 2040 General Development Plan Conception (GDPC) I look into the historical preconditions for the city’s planned development as well as present the legislative climate in which works on Ulaanbaatar’s future development strategies have recently found themselves.

Wpływ COVID-19 na rozwój technologii w Chinach

Od czasu ogłoszenia programu Made in China 2025 w maju 2015 roku, Chiny aspirują na pozycję światowego lidera w dziedzinie nowych technologii. Z ,,fabryki świata”, gdzie zlokalizowana jest ogromna część zakładów produkujących części i komponenty w globalnym łańcuchu dostaw, stają się promotorem innowacyjnych rozwiązań technologicznych. (...) Pojawienie się wirusa COVID-19 stało się motorem rozwoju w tej branży i przyczyniło się do powstania urządzeń i robotów, które do dziś pozostawały jedynie w sferze futurystycznych wizji. 

Korea Południowa w fazie post-COVIDOWEJ

Rząd po wygranej bitwie – zahamowaniu epidemii do marca 2020, wdraża zasady zorganizowania społecznego, aby wygrać wojnę z COVID-19, mając na uwadze prognozy wirusologów o kolejnej fali epidemii prognozowanej na jesień.

Tydzień w Azji #124: Ukryty smok. Pekin chce podbić branżę chipów

Przegląd Tygodnia w Azji to zbiór najważniejszych informacji ze świata polityki i gospodarki państw azjatyckich mijającego tygodnia, tworzony przez analityków Instytutu Boyma we współpracy z Polskim Towarzystwem Wspierania Przedsiębiorczości.

Statut Fundacji

Statut Fundacji INSTYTUT STUDIÓW AZJATYCKICH I GLOBALNYCH IM. MICHAŁA BOYMA z dnia 1 grudnia 2018 r., zmieniony oświadczeniem Fundatora z dnia 21 marca 2019 r.

Czas ekologicznych wyzwań

Inicjatywy i programy o charakterze stricte proekologicznym, jakkolwiek przychylnie przyjęte przez rządy i środowiska naukowe republik Azji Centralnej, nie doczekały się wymiernych efektów w postaci rzeczywistego wpływu na procesy gospodarcze, zwłaszcza w kwestii gospodarowania zasobami...

Adrian Zwoliński dla portalu PolskieRadio24.pl o protestach w Hongkongu

Informujemy, że nasz analityk Adrian Zwoliński udzielił wywiadu dla portalu PolskieRadio24.pl. Tematem rozmowy były protesty w Hongkongu w kontekście walk o przyszłość regionu oraz kwestia 2047 roku.

Azjatech #64: Teraz misja, a w 2117 roku kolonia na Marsie? ZEA weszły do kosmicznej gry

Azjatech to cotygodniowy przegląd najważniejszych informacji o innowacjach i technologii w krajach Azji, tworzony przez zespół analityków Instytutu Boyma we współpracy z Polskim Towarzystwem Wspierania Przedsiębiorczości.

Tydzień w Azji #108: Koreańska odbudowa gospodarcza dwóch prędkości

Przegląd Tygodnia w Azji to zbiór najważniejszych informacji ze świata polityki i gospodarki państw azjatyckich mijającego tygodnia, tworzony przez analityków Instytutu Boyma we współpracy z Polskim Towarzystwem Wspierania Przedsiębiorczości.

Forbes: Singapur coraz bardziej zielony. „Jadalne ogrody” w globalnym centrum finansowym

Ogródki na dachach wysokościowców, uprawy bez światła słonecznego i w dawnym więzieniu, kury w jednym z przodujących centrów finansowych świata – to bogactwo rolnictwa miejskiego w Singapurze...

Sprawozdanie z pobytu w Korei (5-10 listopada 2019)

Między 5 a 9 listopada 2019 przebywałem w Korei Południowej, gdzie miałem zaszczyt wygłosić referat pt. The case of North Korean women who worked in Poland between 2000 and 2018: an empirical study podczas szóstej edycji konferencji TPIC (Trans-Pacific International Conference).

Dzień otwarty Instytutu Boyma

Sezon wakacyjny już za nami! Wracamy do pracy pełni nowej energii i świeżych pomysłów.

Krzysztof Zalewski dla portalu PolskieRadio24.pl o problemach gospodarczych w Azji Południowej

Informujemy, że nasz analityk dr Krzysztof Zalewski udzielił wywiadu dla portalu PolskieRadio24.pl. Tematem rozmowy były wywołane pandemią problemy gospodarcze krajów Azji Południowej.

Tydzień w Azji #49: Jak przesyłki z Chin wpływają na polski rynek e-commerce?

Przegląd Tygodnia w Azji to zbiór najważniejszych informacji ze świata polityki i gospodarki państw azjatyckich mijającego tygodnia, tworzony przez analityków Instytutu Boyma we współpracy z Polskim Towarzystwem Wspierania Przedsiębiorczości.

RP: Wolność gospodarcza krajów Azji Środkowej. Kazachstan nr 1

Jak kształtuje się wolność gospodarcza krajów Azji Środkowej w świetle wyników rankingu The Heritage Foundation? Kazachstan liderem regionu, a w zestawieniu wyprzedził nawet Polskę.

Namaste – uprzejmość w czasach korony

Pandemia wywołała szereg zmian na płaszczyźnie społeczno-kulturowej, wymuszając przewartościowanie dotychczasowych norm i zwyczajów. Konieczność utrzymywania dystansu społecznego i unikania kontaktu fizycznego wyeliminowała z savoir-vivre’u kulturę uścisku dłoni.

Gra w Platona. Z Uki Maroshek-Klarman na temat metody “Betzavta” rozmawia Patrycja Pendrakowska

Wywiad z Uki Maroshek-Klarman - Dyrektorką Naukową Instytutu Adama dla Demokracji i Pokoju w Izraelu, twórczynią metody "Betzavta", która została stworzona z myślą o podwyższeniu partycypacji ludzi w społeczeństwie i ułatwieniu rozwiązywania konfliktów.