Głosy z Azji

Taiwanese Perceptions of Russia’s Ukraine war

Since the invasion of Ukraine, the Taiwanese government remained committed to its position of condemnation for Russia, humanitarian support for Ukraine, and deep appreciation and admiration for the Ukrainian people’s will to defy power, resist aggression, and defend their nation.

Instytut Boyma 27.06.2022

This February, the globe’s second-strongest military power, Russia, launched a war against Ukraine, its neighbor. Since the invasion of Ukraine, the Taiwanese government remained committed to its position of condemnation for Russia, humanitarian support for Ukraine, and deep appreciation and admiration for the Ukrainian people’s will to defy power, resist aggression, and defend their nation.

The tragedy of the invasion has struck a chord with the Taiwanese people, who are widely aware of the events as they unfold. The Ukrainian-Russian war has made Taiwanese people indignant, leading to their determination to support Ukraine. Many Taiwanese who usually do not care much about international politics are now paying close attention to the trajectory of the war.

One of the main reasons for the growing concern and unease among many Taiwanese is that they, like people in Ukraine, are facing a threat of authoritarian aggression from a neighboring power. As such, Taiwanese people not only sympathize with the struggle Ukraine is enduring, but also pay close attention to the impact Ukraine’s situation may have on the future of relations across the Taiwan Strait.

Ukraine today, Taiwan tomorrow? / Ukraine and Taiwan’s Fates Are Not Predetermined

Questions have centered around issues like: Will the war in Ukraine affect the future of Taiwan-China relations? Can Taiwan navigate the cross-Strait relations? Will the United States come to help defend Taiwan in case of uncertainties? The crisis in Europe is bringing questions that have long been asked in Taiwan to the center of public life again.

After Russia’s most recent invasion, the statement “Ukraine today, Taiwan tomorrow” became a hot topic in Taiwan’s public discourse as well as online discussions and platforms. Taiwan has been consistent in maintaining a prudent approach towards the war in Ukraine while avoiding provocation towards China. In general, the Taiwanese government has remained cautious by not over-emphasizing the possibility of a war between China and Taiwan while sending a clear message that Taiwan would not be the first to start a war should it occur.

And the war in Europe has also accelerated changes in Taiwan’s strategic thinking on how to respond to China’s military posture. In recent years, Taiwan has changed its large-force combat strategy to a battalion-level combat method that aligns more closely to the force structure proposed by the United States’ and has also developed asymmetrical warfare capabilities in accordance with Washington’s advice. Nonetheless, Taiwan remains unable to fully defend herself in the case of a total war, all-in attack scenario.

Other changes included a shortening of the military service requirement, from two years to four months, enhancing physical fitness requirements, increasing the proportion of volunteers, and seeking support from like-minded countries, particularly Japan and Australia.

There have been public calls for the Taiwanese government to update and reform military training courses and prepare for a war of resistance while advocating for self-reliance. Civilians, major officials and governmental figures have been discussing the need to enhance “Taiwan’s military readiness, and to what extent Taiwan’s armed forces and civilian population are ready to fend off a Chinese invasion.”

The purpose of these changes is to meet the requirements of modern combat. The general lesson that Taiwan has learned from Ukrainian soldiers’ success is that there is less need to continue relying on large, inflexible, encumbered forces. The current direction of military reform in Taiwan has been encouraged by the devastating guerrilla tactics utilized by Kyiv during the Ukraine war.

Though rightly worried about the potential for war, Taiwanese people are now likely to think that the potential for resisting China is much greater than we previously thought. Though rightly worried about the potential for war, Taiwanese people are now likely to think that the potential for resisting China is much greater than we previously thought. According to Taipei-based think tank Taiwan International Strategic Study Society, 30% more Taiwanese willing to fight for country after Russian invasion of Ukraine, 70% now willing to defend Taiwan against invasion from China. A fait-accompli through force of will and expenditure of lives by China is unlikely. The stalemate in Ukraine has proved that it has not been easy for even a nuclear-armed power like Russia to effectively seize Ukraine.

Most people—while noting that China has been trespassing into the air defense identification zone (ADIZ) – believe that a war in the Taiwan Strait would be much more difficult than the war in Ukraine.

PRC lessons from the Ukraine war

Even still, they believe Chinese leaders would not take the issue of war lightly. In the face of Beijing’s growing coercion, some believe China may consider a longer-term war in the Taiwan Strait, as the length of the Russian-Ukrainian war may have provided them with valuable lessons on how to prepare logistically for war.

Instead of believing that China could seize Taiwan in a few days, the People’s Liberation Army (PLA) may prepare for a longer, all-consuming war with Taipei. The war in Ukraine has at the very least shown the CCP regime what toolbox the West intends to use against aggressors in the future. The possibility that the CCP is waiting for an opportune moment to launch a war against Taiwan thus remains high.

The cross-Strait invasion issue is a longstanding one. The continuing rule of Chinese President Xi Jinping is another potential tinderbox – Xi could consider war with Taiwan as the perfect “strategic card” for him to retain or consolidate his political power given dissent among China’s ruling elite. But in all likelihood, the lesson that China has learned is that it must get well- prepared when considering using the military to annex Taiwan. Hence, Beijing will need more time to prepare.

American strategic ambiguity

Pressure from the PRC was mounting prior to Putin’s war in Ukraine. After it has started, it remains uncertain that the Biden administration would come to support Taiwan by sending troops to the Taiwan Strait. From Secretary Blinken’s recent China speech, it is clear that the purpose of the United States is the eventual complete containment and collapse of the CCP.

The salvation of Taiwan is not necessary to achieve that end, so it is unclear if the United States would be willing to send troops to defend Taiwan, or only provide weapons and then impose economic sanctions on China.

The administration of Taiwanese president Tsai Ing-wen should enhance country’s status by raising our reputation as a valuable and fierce military partner. The partnership Taiwan shares with both the United States and Japan is indispensable and longstanding. Many Taiwanese maintain that the United States and Japan would come to Taiwan’s aid in a conflict. Taiwan should expand its strategic partnerships to include more robust relationships with nations around the globe. A network of like-minded states and geopolitical players in the region can increase collective awareness of the strategic importance of Taiwan and can make the Indo- Pacific the safest region to trade and navigate in the world.

Bibliography

  1. 詹威克, “客座评论:乌克兰战争改变台湾战略思考”, 12 May 2022,
    https://www.dw.com/zh/ 客座評論烏克蘭戰爭改變台灣戰略思考/a-61760685
    “烏克蘭戰爭與台灣的未來》BBC解答俄烏衝突和台海情勢的三個關鍵問題”,
  2. The Storm Media, 14 March 2022,
    https://www.storm.mg/article/4236814?page=1
    Brian Hioe, “Taiwan Watches the Ukraine Invasion and Asks: Are We
    Ready?”,
  3. The Diplomat, 15 March 2022,
    https://thediplomat.com/2022/03/taiwan-watches-the-ukraine-invasion-and-
    asks-are-we-ready/
  4. https://www.taiwannews.com.tw/en/news/4476140
Kuan Ting Chen

Kuan-Ting Chen jest dyrektorem generalnym Taiwan NextGen Foundation, think-tanku działającego na rzecz zrównoważonego rozwoju Tajwanu, jego różnorodności i integracji społecznej. Jest również gospodarzem podcastu "Vision on China", nadawanego przez Radio Taiwan International. Był zastępcą rzecznika prasowego Urzędu Miasta Tajpej oraz pracownikiem Rady Bezpieczeństwa Narodowego. Posiada tytuł magistra polityki publicznej, który uzyskał na Uniwersytecie Tokijskim.

TAGI: / / / /

czytaj więcej

Globalne wyzwania ekologiczne i premiera Kwartalnika Boyma 1(3)/2020

Zapraszamy na premierę trzeciego numeru Kwartalnika Boyma oraz debatę związaną z problematyką ochrony środowiska w Azji. WeWork, Mennica Legacy Tower, ul. Prosta 20, 3 lutego, godzina 18:00.

Tydzień w Azji #97: Szczepionka z Kazachstanu? Covidowa rywalizacja w Azji Centralnej

Przegląd Tygodnia w Azji to zbiór najważniejszych informacji ze świata polityki i gospodarki państw azjatyckich mijającego tygodnia, tworzony przez analityków Instytutu Boyma we współpracy z Polskim Towarzystwem Wspierania Przedsiębiorczości.

Indyjski speed dating, czyli małżeństwa aranżowane

Serdecznie zapraszamy na spotkanie na temat małżeństw aranżowanych w Indiach już 2 marca w biurze WeWork Mennica Legacy Tower, przy ul. Prostej 20. Spotkanie poprowadzi analityczka ds. Indii Instytutu Boyma, Iga Bielawska.

Forbes: AUKUS. W Azji kształtuje się nowy ład

Ameryka w ten sposób dokonuje realnego zwrotu w stronę Azji, pociągając za sobą najbardziej zaufanych aliantów. Gra toczy się nie tylko o kwestie bezpieczeństwa, ale też o ład gospodarczy i supremację technologiczną

Azjatech #104: Chiński fenomen wideo na rynku e-commerce pod lupą partii

Azjatech to cotygodniowy przegląd najważniejszych informacji o innowacjach i technologii w krajach Azji, tworzony przez zespół analityków Instytutu Boyma we współpracy z Polskim Towarzystwem Wspierania Przedsiębiorczości.

Tydzień w Azji #168: Chiny bliżej Afganistanu. Pomoc nie będzie bezinteresowna

Przegląd Tygodnia w Azji to zbiór najważniejszych informacji ze świata polityki i gospodarki państw azjatyckich mijającego tygodnia, tworzony przez analityków Instytutu Boyma we współpracy z Polskim Towarzystwem Wspierania Przedsiębiorczości.

Krytyka Polityczna: To nie będzie jeszcze rok Brontoroca [co dalej na Dalekim Wschodzie]

Moskwa i Pekin pozostaną w dość bliskim kontakcie, na Indo-Pacyfiku powstanie największa strefa wolnego handlu na świecie, a USA grozi stopniowa utrata znaczenia. Krzysztof Marcin Zalewski o tym, co przyniesie nowy rok na Dalekim Wschodzie.

Tydzień w Azji: Czy kolejny rok koreański film Minari zdominuje tegoroczne Oscary?

Rok 2020 był dla kinematografii południowokoreańskiej rokiem triumfu - po raz pierwszy koreański film zdobył tak wiele nagród - w tym najważniejszą nagrodę Oscara i to na dodatek w 4 kategoriach (...) Rok 2021, za sprawą filmu “Minari” zapowiada się równie ekscytująco dla kinematografii koreańskiej. 

Instytut Boyma rozpoczął realizację projektu „Transcultural Caravan”!

Tematem tegorocznej edycji TSRSG jest "Wpływ Inicjatywy Pasa i Szlaku na Europę - Przypadek Polski i Niemiec"

Forbes: Zbyt duzi, by ich nie poskromić. Chiny, UE i USA chcą ograniczyć potęgę gigantów technologicznych

Rosnący w czasie pandemii wpływ gigantów technologicznych i platform cyfrowych budzi poczucie konieczności działania wśród decydentów politycznych na całym świecie. Stany Zjednoczone, Unia Europejska i Chiny szukają dróg mających na celu zmniejszenie wpływu wielkich graczy dominujących na rynku i uzyskujących zbyt duży wpływ na życie społeczne i gospodarcze

Korea Południowa w fazie post-COVIDOWEJ

Rząd po wygranej bitwie – zahamowaniu epidemii do marca 2020, wdraża zasady zorganizowania społecznego, aby wygrać wojnę z COVID-19, mając na uwadze prognozy wirusologów o kolejnej fali epidemii prognozowanej na jesień.

Fake newsy i farmy trolli – streszczenie spotkania

W dniu 17 grudnia br. w siedzibie Instytutu Boyma odbyła się autorska debata na podstawie reportaży wcieleniowych Anny Sobolewskiej i Katarzyny Pruszkiewicz. Dziennikarki przedstawiły w jaki sposób wygląda praca w przemyśle dezinformacji, a także wyjaśniły jak tworzenie manipulowanych i opłacanych wypowiedzi w Internecie może wpłynąć na opinię publiczną.

Tydzień w Azji #76: Bye, bye TikTok. Indie wyrzucają z rynku chińskich graczy

Przegląd Tygodnia w Azji to zbiór najważniejszych informacji ze świata polityki i gospodarki państw azjatyckich mijającego tygodnia, tworzony przez analityków Instytutu Boyma we współpracy z Polskim Towarzystwem Wspierania Przedsiębiorczości.

RP: Niemiecka ustawa o nadzorze nad łańcuchami dostaw już na horyzoncie

1 stycznia 2023 r. wejdzie w życie niemiecka ustawa federalna, która ma zapobiegać naruszeniom praw człowieka i standardów ekologicznych w globalnych łańcuchach dostaw tworzonych przez koncerny RFN. Ma ona co najmniej 3 rodzaje konsekwencji dla polskich firm.

Tydzień w Azji #142: Polskie firmy celują w Azję Centralną. Pandemia im nie przeszkadza

Przegląd Tygodnia w Azji to zbiór najważniejszych informacji ze świata polityki i gospodarki państw azjatyckich mijającego tygodnia, tworzony przez analityków Instytutu Boyma we współpracy z Polskim Towarzystwem Wspierania Przedsiębiorczości.

Tydzień w Azji #53: Tajwan chce umowy o wolnym handlu z USA

Przegląd Tygodnia w Azji to zbiór najważniejszych informacji ze świata polityki i gospodarki państw azjatyckich mijającego tygodnia, tworzony przez analityków Instytutu Boyma we współpracy z Polskim Towarzystwem Wspierania Przedsiębiorczości.

Jak prowadzić badania społeczne w Chinach? – subiektywny przewodnik po pobycie w CASS

Mimo rosnącego zainteresowania Państwem Środka, ciągle  niewielu polskich naukowców decyduje się na prowadzenie badań za Wielkim Murem.

RP: Targi międzynarodowe w Uzbekistanie znów na żywo

Uzbekistan stopniowo znosi obostrzenia związane z pandemią. Teraz przyszedł czas na przywrócenie działalności branży targowo-wystawienniczej.

Kurs on-line: “Conflict Resolution and Democracy”

Instytut Adama zaprasza do udziału w nowym kursie poświęconym rozwiązywaniu konfliktów i wspomaganiu procesów demokratycznych z pomocą metody Betzavta. Zajęcia prowadzone będą za pośrednictwem platformy ZOOM.

Tydzień w Azji #101: Chiński rok 2020. Centrum świata przesuwa się nad (Indo)Pacyfik

Przegląd Tygodnia w Azji to zbiór najważniejszych informacji ze świata polityki i gospodarki państw azjatyckich mijającego tygodnia, tworzony przez analityków Instytutu Boyma we współpracy z Polskim Towarzystwem Wspierania Przedsiębiorczości

Spotkanie „Wpływ filozofii na współczesną Azję” na Uniwersytecie Warszawskim

Patrycja Pendrakowska opowie w swojej prelekcji o recepcji Hegla w Chinach.

Azjatech #89: Koniec masztów? Japoński SoftBank pracuje nad powietrznymi przekaźnikami 5G

Azjatech to cotygodniowy przegląd najważniejszych informacji o innowacjach i technologii w krajach Azji, tworzony przez zespół analityków Instytutu Boyma we współpracy z Polskim Towarzystwem Wspierania Przedsiębiorczości.

Ścieżki armeńskiej armii: przełomowe momenty w historii powstania, pozycja armii i wyzwania przed którymi dziś stoi

Na początku roku Siły Zbrojne Republiki Armenii świętowały kolejną rocznicę powstania, która datuje się dokładnie na 28 stycznia 1992 roku. Przez ostatnie 28 lat armia armeńska przeżyła różne momenty przełomowe, z których, można powiedzieć, że wyszła zwycięsko.

Północnokoreańska loteria wojownicza i co dalej?

W ostatnim czasie sytuacja geopolityczna Korei Północnej gwałtownie się pogorszyła pod wpływem retoryki prezydenta Stanów Zjednoczonych – Donalda Trumpa. Celem tego komentarza jest przedstawienie nietuzinkowego obrazu potencjalnego zjednoczenia Korei w świetle polityki amerykańskiej nowego przywództwa tego państwa. Władze amerykańskie, które poprzez zjednoczenie Półwyspu Koreańskiego mogłyby wysłać oddziały armii Stanów Zjednoczonych na aktualną granicę chińsko-północnokoreańską.