Publicystyka

“Green growth” may well be more of the same

Witnessing the recent flurry of political activity amid the accelerating environmental emergency, from the Green New Deal to the UN climate summits to European political initiatives, one could be forgiven for thinking that things are finally moving forward.

Instytut Boyma 27.01.2020

Witnessing the recent flurry of political activity amid the accelerating environmental emergency, from the Green New Deal to the UN climate summits to European political initiatives, one could be forgiven for thinking that things are finally moving forward. Even though none of the specific measures under discussion is ultimately up to the task on its own, climate has entered political vocabulary and is here to stay. The question however is not simply how to go beyond paying mere lip service and ensure lofty pledges become reality. The question is whether the ideological underpinnings of these mesures have the necessary potential for envisioning and initiating meaningful change.

Increasingly, the answer seems to be “no”.

The problem is not only that these initiatives – and others in the same vein – have failed to deliver on their promises or are unlikely to ever come to fruition. The problem is this: Even if they succeeded by their own account, they would still operate within a political and economic system that arguably cannot by definition stave off the crises to come, and whose continued existence virtually guarantees the worst-case scenarios will become reality.

The way we have been going about the environmental emergency invites hypocrisy. One of the most glaring examples is infrastructural investments aimed at facilitating transportation and trade. Often touted as “green”, they continue apace despite the fact that not only do they require aggressive resource extraction, generate waste, emit carbon dioxide, and destroy wildlife habitats, but they are also bound to lock in further environmental damage for decades to come (to put it simply, more roads mean more traffic). What is expected to power those gigantic infrastructural projects is another gigantic infrastructural project: renewable energy. While we do our best to overlook the fact that “transition to renewables is going to require a dramatic increase in the extraction of metals and rare-earth minerals, with real ecological and social costs”, the truth remains the same: “The only truly clean energy is less energy”[1].

Effective PR allows governments and businesses alike to couch harmful initiatives in the soothing language of purported sustainability. While growing numbers of consumers and analysts take such proclamations with a pinch of salt, most still seem to barely even notice. After all, pouring concrete has been the symbol of the miracle of economic growth for generations, and the whirring blades of a wind turbine promise to become another one in the foreseeable future.

What we need to consider is the following: What if overconsumption that sends our mammalian instincts into overdrive and provides the current economic and political system with justification for its existence and for the means it takes to sustain itself simply cannot continue? What if the necessary reduction and reversal of our impacts on the planet’s climate system, as well as on its overall environmental condition, cannot be achieved within the confines of our current economic paradigm? What if the juggernaut of perpetual growth and free trade is inherently incompatible with the continued habitability of the biosphere that we take for granted? What if “green growth” is indeed a fantasy and a trick we fool ourselves with? What if we need to rebuild the system we inhabit from the ground up, and fast?

Faced with these questions, it’s perfectly understandable to come to the conclusion that all the much-touted recent initiatives are nothing but treading water, or worse. That’s where alternatives come in. Advocates of “degrowth” or “post-growth” propose more than an overhaul of the system: They recommend replacing it with one better aligned with the planetary realities we can no longer ignore. As one definition puts it, degrowth is “a downscaling of production and consumption that increases human well-being and enhances ecological conditions and equity on the planet”, which “challenge[s] the centrality of GDP as an overarching policy objective” and where the “primacy of efficiency will be substituted by a focus on sufficiency”[2]. “Humanity has to understand itself as part of the planetary ecological system”, according to another formulation that emphasises a need for “a fundamental transformation of our lives and an extensive cultural change”[3]. Yet another interpretation provides a crucial clarifying point: “Post-growth economies and societies will not be static; they will be developing still, but within planetary limits, and they will not be betting their futures on the assumption of endless material growth”[4]. The path that we have taken is just one among many, and it has already shown its true colours. We don’t have to stay on it.

But the predicament we are in is this: Whichever country begins applying degrowth first may find itself at the mercy of the increasingly anarchic international system. What it faces may not necessarily be an old-school military invasion by a foreign power, but a much more pernicious threat: hostile takeover. In the absence of strong international cooperation and institutions, the global commons are up for grabs. We are being discouraged from doing the right thing.

It has become trivially easy for any major player on the global stage to say all the right things about the environment and trumpet technological solutions far and wide, while at the same time pushing one brute-force carbon-intensive infrastructural project after another in pursuit of more material wealth and at the expense of energy that environmentally we can no longer afford. Appearing to lead can often be just that: an appearance. In the short term it is easier to lead the unsuspecting (or even acquiescing) audience on. Some are expert at this: It is not far-fetched to say that Donald Trump could easily win favours with the global public opinion by adopting green rhetoric while carrying on with his ecocidal policies. His base would no doubt buy into that as well.

The challenge the efforts to prioritise climate and the environment face is this: By making it clear how deep and wide the necessary transformation needs to be, they risk triggering a powerful self-preservation pushback from those who benefit from the status quo. They already have. Alternative paths to human well-being within the natural world are already being dismissed as too difficult or outlandish to even contemplate. As the debate heats up together with the climate, we are speeding – with our streamlined rhetoric and polished slogans – towards the edge of the cliff.

Niniejszy materiał znajdą Państwo w Kwartalniku Boyma nr – 3/2020

Przypisy:

[1] Jason Hickel. “The Limits of Clean Energy”. Foreign Policy 6.09.2019. https://foreignpolicy.com/2019/09/06/the-path-to-clean-energy-will-be-very-dirty-climate-change-renewables/

[2] Definition. degrowth.com (n.d.). https://degrowth.org/definition-2/

[3] What is degrowth? degrowth.info (n.d.). https://www.degrowth.info/en/what-is-degrowth/

[4][4]  Ian Christie, Ben Gallant, Simon Mair. “Growing pain: the delusion of boundless economic growth”. Open Democracy 26.09.2019. https://www.opendemocracy.net/en/oureconomy/growing-pain-delusion-boundless-economic-growth/

Dawid Juraszek

Ekspert ds. globalnych problemów środowiskowych. Pisarz, poeta, publicysta, wieloletni wykładowca w chińskim szkolnictwie wyższym. Doktorant Uniwersytetu w Maastricht, absolwent filologii angielskiej, przywództwa w oświacie, zarządzania środowiskiem i stosunków międzynarodowych. Poza Polską publikował w USA, Wielkiej Brytanii, Kanadzie i Australii.

czytaj więcej

Historia sukcesu? 30-lecie kazachskiej państwowości i wyzwania na przyszłość

Jak z tymi wyzwaniami poradzi sobie Kazachstan? Jaki może być udział Polski i Unii Europejskiej w kolejnym kazachskim skoku rozwojowym? Jakie szanse znajdzie tam dla siebie nasz biznes? 

Tydzień w Azji: Kirgistan na drodze politycznej stabilizacji

10 stycznia odbyły się w Kirgistanie przyspieszone wybory prezydenckie (...) Atmosfera społeczna tego głosowania pozostawała wciąż napięta, od momentu ogłoszenia wyników październikowych wyborów, w których żadne ugrupowanie opozycyjne nie zdobyło nawet jednego mandatu poselskiego.

Tydzień w Azji #96: W Azji dla Azji: o konsekwencjach nowej umowy handlowej

Przegląd Tygodnia w Azji to zbiór najważniejszych informacji ze świata polityki i gospodarki państw azjatyckich mijającego tygodnia, tworzony przez analityków Instytutu Boyma we współpracy z Polskim Towarzystwem Wspierania Przedsiębiorczości.

Czas ekologicznych wyzwań

Inicjatywy i programy o charakterze stricte proekologicznym, jakkolwiek przychylnie przyjęte przez rządy i środowiska naukowe republik Azji Centralnej, nie doczekały się wymiernych efektów w postaci rzeczywistego wpływu na procesy gospodarcze, zwłaszcza w kwestii gospodarowania zasobami...

Azjatech #11: Uzbekistan wyprodukuje papier z kamienia

Azjatech to cotygodniowy przegląd najważniejszych informacji o innowacjach i technologii w krajach Azji, tworzony przez zespół analityków Instytutu Boyma we współpracy z Polskim Towarzystwem Wspierania Przedsiębiorczości.

RP: Indie – co trzeba wiedzieć wchodząc na rynek indyjski?

Po pandemicznym załamaniu ekonomii Indie powinny, wedle ostatnich prognoz Banku Światowego, wrócić na szybką ścieżkę rozwoju, w granicach 10 proc. wzrostu PKB rocznie. Nie dziwi zatem, że wielu inwestorów coraz częściej spogląda właśnie w kierunku największej demokracji świata.

Tydzień w Azji#15: Jaka przyszłość Sri Lanki po zamachach?

Przegląd Tygodnia w Azji to zbiór najważniejszych informacji ze świata polityki i gospodarki państw azjatyckich mijającego tygodnia, tworzony przez analityków Instytutu Boyma we współpracy z Polskim Towarzystwem Wspierania Przedsiębiorczości. W tym numerze piszemy m.in o zamachach terrorystycznych na Sri Lance (w tym ich możliwych skutkach gospodarczych), inwestycjach w sektorze energetycznym Indonezji oraz nowych amerykańskich sankcjach wymierzonych w Iran.

Jak nie rozpętać Trzeciej Wojny Światowej, czyli spór o Kaszmir – Gra strategiczna

Wyobraźmy sobie, że konflikt wokół Kaszmiru można rozwiązać. Wyobraźmy sobie, że można to zrobić na forum Szanghajskiej Organizacji Współpracy, której wszystkie państwa sporu są członkami. Instytut Boyma i Forum Młodych Dyplomatów zapraszają wspólnie do udziału w grze strategicznej.

Tydzień w Azji #47: Negocjacje z WTO, rozmowy o EAUE. Czy Uzbekistan musi wybrać?

Przegląd Tygodnia w Azji to zbiór najważniejszych informacji ze świata polityki i gospodarki państw azjatyckich mijającego tygodnia, tworzony przez analityków Instytutu Boyma we współpracy z Polskim Towarzystwem Wspierania Przedsiębiorczości.

Tydzień w Azji: 2020 – wyjątkowy rok dla kinematografii Korei Południowej

Historia kinematografii koreańskiej liczy 100 lat i sięga roku 1919, kiedy po raz pierwszy pokazano koreański film „Walka o sprawiedliwość”. W sto lat później kino koreańskie może mówić o światowym sukcesie swoich filmów.

Korea Północna w walce z COVID-19

Rząd Korei Północnej nie przywykł do tego, by się tłumaczyć światu zewnętrznemu ze swoich działań. Według oficjalnej propagandy, jak do tej pory w KRLD nie było żadnej ofiary śmiertelnej spowodowanej głośnym wirusem COVID-19. (...) Milczenie Pjongjangu nie oznacza jednak, że nie wiemy nic na temat tego co się dzieje.

Tydzień w Azji #118: Unia celuje w Indopacyfik. Pora na polską strategię

Przegląd Tygodnia w Azji to zbiór najważniejszych informacji ze świata polityki i gospodarki państw azjatyckich mijającego tygodnia, tworzony przez analityków Instytutu Boyma we współpracy z Polskim Towarzystwem Wspierania Przedsiębiorczości.

Anna Grzywacz na konferencji pt. “Azja Południowo-Wschodnia jako region kontrastów – wyzwania i perspektywy”

Wydarzenie odbędzie się w formule on-line za pośrednictwem platformy Google Meet, w piątek 15 stycznia o godzinie 10:00.

Północnokoreańska loteria wojownicza i co dalej?

W ostatnim czasie sytuacja geopolityczna Korei Północnej gwałtownie się pogorszyła pod wpływem retoryki prezydenta Stanów Zjednoczonych – Donalda Trumpa. Celem tego komentarza jest przedstawienie nietuzinkowego obrazu potencjalnego zjednoczenia Korei w świetle polityki amerykańskiej nowego przywództwa tego państwa. Władze amerykańskie, które poprzez zjednoczenie Półwyspu Koreańskiego mogłyby wysłać oddziały armii Stanów Zjednoczonych na aktualną granicę chińsko-północnokoreańską.

Tydzień w Azji #55: Euroazjatyckie tournée Mike’a Pompeo

Przegląd Tygodnia w Azji to zbiór najważniejszych informacji ze świata polityki i gospodarki państw azjatyckich mijającego tygodnia, tworzony przez analityków Instytutu Boyma we współpracy z Polskim Towarzystwem Wspierania Przedsiębiorczości.

RP: Wolność gospodarcza krajów Azji Środkowej. Kazachstan nr 1

Jak kształtuje się wolność gospodarcza krajów Azji Środkowej w świetle wyników rankingu The Heritage Foundation? Kazachstan liderem regionu, a w zestawieniu wyprzedził nawet Polskę.

Tydzień w Azji #70: Współpraca w ASEAN, a nie izolacja, gwarancją bezpieczeństwa żywieniowego

Przegląd Tygodnia w Azji to zbiór najważniejszych informacji ze świata polityki i gospodarki państw azjatyckich, tworzony we współpracy z Polskim Towarzystwem Wspierania Przedsiębiorczości.

Dr Nicolas Levi dla portalu PolskieRadio24.pl o próbach rakietowych Korei Północnej

Informujemy, że nasz analityk dr Nicolas Levi udzielił wywiadu dla portalu PolskieRadio24.pl. Tematem rozmowy były próby rakietowe Korei Północnej, ich wpływ na amerykańską politykę w regionie i zachowanie chińkich władz.

Książka “The Role of Regions in EU-China Relations” w wolnym dostępie

Zapraszamy do pobrania wersji elektronicznej książki pod redakcją dr Tomasza Kamińskiego. Ta anglojęzyczna pozycja opisująca rolę jednostek samorządowych w relacjach Unii Europejskiej z Chinami stanowi kolejną książkę umieszczoną w wolnym dostępie na naszej stronie

Tydzień w Azji #67: Hongkong – nadchodzi druga fala demonstracji

Przegląd Tygodnia w Azji to zbiór najważniejszych informacji ze świata polityki i gospodarki państw azjatyckich mijającego tygodnia, tworzony przez analityków Instytutu Boyma we współpracy z Polskim Towarzystwem Wspierania Przedsiębiorczości.

Drug and Road Initiative, czyli Jedwabny Szlak narkotykowy

Prezentowane opracowanie podejmuje problematykę narkobiznesu w poradzieckiej Azji Centralnej, który to region odgrywa kluczową rolę w przerzucie zakazanych substancji z Azji (głównie Afganistan) do Europy. W opracowaniu dokonano krótkiej prezentacji obszarów składających się na obraz narkobiznesu w Azji Centralnej, zwracając uwagę na produkcję i dystrybucję. 

Kurs on-line: “Conflict Resolution and Democracy”

Instytut Adama zaprasza do udziału w nowym kursie poświęconym rozwiązywaniu konfliktów i wspomaganiu procesów demokratycznych z pomocą metody Betzavta. Zajęcia prowadzone będą za pośrednictwem platformy ZOOM.

Tydzień w Azji: Tanio, blisko, otwarte. Ten biznes w Indiach się kręci…

Radhakishan Damani jest jednym z dwóch indyjskich miliarderów z listy Bloomberga, których majątek w ostatnim czasie nie stopniał.

Komu przeszkadza ianfuzō (”comfort woman”)? O cenzurze na festiwalu Aichi Triennale w Japonii

Tytuł jednej z wystaw tegorocznego Aichi Triennale w Japonii przykuwał uwagę niepokojącym pytaniem: “Po «wolności słowa»?”. Znając późniejsze losy ekspozycji, można odpowiedzieć: “chyba tak”.

Chiny – USA na Morzu Południowochińskim

Wojna handlowa jest tylko jednym z aspektów konfrontacji między Stanami Zjednoczonymi i Chińską Republiką Ludową. Wiele aspektów tej rywalizacji zbiega się na Morzu Południowochińskim.