Publicystyka

“Green growth” may well be more of the same

Witnessing the recent flurry of political activity amid the accelerating environmental emergency, from the Green New Deal to the UN climate summits to European political initiatives, one could be forgiven for thinking that things are finally moving forward.

Instytut Boyma 27.01.2020

Witnessing the recent flurry of political activity amid the accelerating environmental emergency, from the Green New Deal to the UN climate summits to European political initiatives, one could be forgiven for thinking that things are finally moving forward. Even though none of the specific measures under discussion is ultimately up to the task on its own, climate has entered political vocabulary and is here to stay. The question however is not simply how to go beyond paying mere lip service and ensure lofty pledges become reality. The question is whether the ideological underpinnings of these mesures have the necessary potential for envisioning and initiating meaningful change.

Increasingly, the answer seems to be “no”.

The problem is not only that these initiatives – and others in the same vein – have failed to deliver on their promises or are unlikely to ever come to fruition. The problem is this: Even if they succeeded by their own account, they would still operate within a political and economic system that arguably cannot by definition stave off the crises to come, and whose continued existence virtually guarantees the worst-case scenarios will become reality.

The way we have been going about the environmental emergency invites hypocrisy. One of the most glaring examples is infrastructural investments aimed at facilitating transportation and trade. Often touted as “green”, they continue apace despite the fact that not only do they require aggressive resource extraction, generate waste, emit carbon dioxide, and destroy wildlife habitats, but they are also bound to lock in further environmental damage for decades to come (to put it simply, more roads mean more traffic). What is expected to power those gigantic infrastructural projects is another gigantic infrastructural project: renewable energy. While we do our best to overlook the fact that “transition to renewables is going to require a dramatic increase in the extraction of metals and rare-earth minerals, with real ecological and social costs”, the truth remains the same: “The only truly clean energy is less energy”[1].

Effective PR allows governments and businesses alike to couch harmful initiatives in the soothing language of purported sustainability. While growing numbers of consumers and analysts take such proclamations with a pinch of salt, most still seem to barely even notice. After all, pouring concrete has been the symbol of the miracle of economic growth for generations, and the whirring blades of a wind turbine promise to become another one in the foreseeable future.

What we need to consider is the following: What if overconsumption that sends our mammalian instincts into overdrive and provides the current economic and political system with justification for its existence and for the means it takes to sustain itself simply cannot continue? What if the necessary reduction and reversal of our impacts on the planet’s climate system, as well as on its overall environmental condition, cannot be achieved within the confines of our current economic paradigm? What if the juggernaut of perpetual growth and free trade is inherently incompatible with the continued habitability of the biosphere that we take for granted? What if “green growth” is indeed a fantasy and a trick we fool ourselves with? What if we need to rebuild the system we inhabit from the ground up, and fast?

Faced with these questions, it’s perfectly understandable to come to the conclusion that all the much-touted recent initiatives are nothing but treading water, or worse. That’s where alternatives come in. Advocates of “degrowth” or “post-growth” propose more than an overhaul of the system: They recommend replacing it with one better aligned with the planetary realities we can no longer ignore. As one definition puts it, degrowth is “a downscaling of production and consumption that increases human well-being and enhances ecological conditions and equity on the planet”, which “challenge[s] the centrality of GDP as an overarching policy objective” and where the “primacy of efficiency will be substituted by a focus on sufficiency”[2]. “Humanity has to understand itself as part of the planetary ecological system”, according to another formulation that emphasises a need for “a fundamental transformation of our lives and an extensive cultural change”[3]. Yet another interpretation provides a crucial clarifying point: “Post-growth economies and societies will not be static; they will be developing still, but within planetary limits, and they will not be betting their futures on the assumption of endless material growth”[4]. The path that we have taken is just one among many, and it has already shown its true colours. We don’t have to stay on it.

But the predicament we are in is this: Whichever country begins applying degrowth first may find itself at the mercy of the increasingly anarchic international system. What it faces may not necessarily be an old-school military invasion by a foreign power, but a much more pernicious threat: hostile takeover. In the absence of strong international cooperation and institutions, the global commons are up for grabs. We are being discouraged from doing the right thing.

It has become trivially easy for any major player on the global stage to say all the right things about the environment and trumpet technological solutions far and wide, while at the same time pushing one brute-force carbon-intensive infrastructural project after another in pursuit of more material wealth and at the expense of energy that environmentally we can no longer afford. Appearing to lead can often be just that: an appearance. In the short term it is easier to lead the unsuspecting (or even acquiescing) audience on. Some are expert at this: It is not far-fetched to say that Donald Trump could easily win favours with the global public opinion by adopting green rhetoric while carrying on with his ecocidal policies. His base would no doubt buy into that as well.

The challenge the efforts to prioritise climate and the environment face is this: By making it clear how deep and wide the necessary transformation needs to be, they risk triggering a powerful self-preservation pushback from those who benefit from the status quo. They already have. Alternative paths to human well-being within the natural world are already being dismissed as too difficult or outlandish to even contemplate. As the debate heats up together with the climate, we are speeding – with our streamlined rhetoric and polished slogans – towards the edge of the cliff.

Niniejszy materiał znajdą Państwo w Kwartalniku Boyma nr – 3/2020

Przypisy:

[1] Jason Hickel. “The Limits of Clean Energy”. Foreign Policy 6.09.2019. https://foreignpolicy.com/2019/09/06/the-path-to-clean-energy-will-be-very-dirty-climate-change-renewables/

[2] Definition. degrowth.com (n.d.). https://degrowth.org/definition-2/

[3] What is degrowth? degrowth.info (n.d.). https://www.degrowth.info/en/what-is-degrowth/

[4][4]  Ian Christie, Ben Gallant, Simon Mair. “Growing pain: the delusion of boundless economic growth”. Open Democracy 26.09.2019. https://www.opendemocracy.net/en/oureconomy/growing-pain-delusion-boundless-economic-growth/

Dawid Juraszek

Ekspert ds. globalnych problemów środowiskowych. Autor książki "Antropocen dla początkujących. Klimat, środowisko, pandemie w epoce człowieka". Doktorant Uniwersytetu w Maastricht (ekokrytyka poznawcza), absolwent filologii angielskiej, przywództwa w oświacie, zarządzania środowiskiem i stosunków międzynarodowych. Pisał m.in. dla Dwutygodnika, Liberté!, Krytyki Politycznej, Gazety Wyborczej, Polityki, Newsweeka, Ha!artu, Lampy, Focusa Historia, Podróży i Poznaj Świat, a także dla licznych publikacji w Stanach Zjednoczonych, Wielkiej Brytanii, Australii, Kanadzie, Irlandii i Nowej Zelandii. Od kilkunastu lat pracuje w chińskim szkolnictwie wyższym.

czytaj więcej

Azjatech #168: Indie biorą się za porządkowanie mediów społecznościowych

Azjatech to cotygodniowy przegląd najważniejszych informacji o innowacjach i technologii w krajach Azji, tworzony przez zespół analityków Instytutu Boyma we współpracy z Polskim Towarzystwem Wspierania Przedsiębiorczości.

Podcasty „Dziesiątki z Boymem” dostępne do odsłuchu na Spotify

"Dziesiątka z Boymem" to seria dziesięciominutowych podcastów tworzonych z naszymi ekspertami. Opowiadamy w nich o procesach i wydarzeniach w Azji, które mają globalne znaczenie.

Azjatech #221: Chiny planują budowę atomowych kontenerowców

Azjatech to cotygodniowy przegląd najważniejszych informacji o innowacjach i technologii w krajach Azji, tworzony przez zespół analityków Instytutu Boyma we współpracy z Polskim Towarzystwem Wspierania Przedsiębiorczości.

Czas ekologicznych wyzwań

Inicjatywy i programy o charakterze stricte proekologicznym, jakkolwiek przychylnie przyjęte przez rządy i środowiska naukowe republik Azji Centralnej, nie doczekały się wymiernych efektów w postaci rzeczywistego wpływu na procesy gospodarcze, zwłaszcza w kwestii gospodarowania zasobami. Wciąż niestety, w państwach określanych wspólnym mianem emerging markets, dominuje bowiem aksjomat podporządkowania kwestii ekologicznych zapewnieniu stałego rozwoju ekonomicznego.

Tydzień w Azji #83: Korea Południowa wychodzi na prostą po koronakryzysie

Przegląd Tygodnia w Azji to zbiór najważniejszych informacji ze świata polityki i gospodarki państw azjatyckich mijającego tygodnia, tworzony przez analityków Instytutu Boyma we współpracy z Polskim Towarzystwem Wspierania Przedsiębiorczości.

Azjatech #55: Pandemia uderza w prywatność

Azjatech to cotygodniowy przegląd najważniejszych informacji o innowacjach i technologii w krajach Azji, tworzony przez zespół analityków Instytutu Boyma we współpracy z Polskim Towarzystwem Wspierania Przedsiębiorczości.

Polityka (pro?)rodzinna Państwa Środka

Problem demograficzny Państwa Środka stał się głównym wyzwaniem dla XXI-wiecznej polityki wewnętrznej kraju. Rząd chiński od 2015 roku, po całkowitym wycofaniu się z polityki jednego dziecka, próbuje spowolnić kryzys demograficzny i idące za nim negatywne skutki, jednak działania te pozostają niewystarczające i nie satysfakcjonują potencjalnych przyszłych rodziców.

Patrycja Pendrakowska dla Observer Research Foundation o sytuacji w Polsce w czasie pandemii

W swoim artykule Patrycja Pendrakowska opisuje najważniejsze wydarzenia w Polsce, towarzyszące pandemii koronawirusa.

Azjatech #93: Wietnam chce zawojować zagraniczne rynki samochodami elektrycznymi

Azjatech to cotygodniowy przegląd najważniejszych informacji o innowacjach i technologii w krajach Azji, tworzony przez zespół analityków Instytutu Boyma we współpracy z Polskim Towarzystwem Wspierania Przedsiębiorczości.

#Azjatech 52: Bez portfela, bez karty, bez kodu. Kolejny etap cyfrowej rewolucji w Korei

Azjatech to cotygodniowy przegląd najważniejszych informacji o innowacjach i technologii w krajach Azji, tworzony przez zespół analityków Instytutu Boyma we współpracy z Polskim Towarzystwem Wspierania Przedsiębiorczości.

Nie zawsze diabły. Różne strategie wobec inności w kinie KRLD

„Inni” to dla Ryszarda Kapuścińskiego przede wszystkim „nie-Europejczycy”. Analogicznie w kinematografii KRLD „innym” jest „nie-Koreańczyk”. Od początku powstania Korei Północnej jej artyści operowali jasnym i dychotomicznym obrazem świata. To, co nasze, czyli uri (우리) było przedstawiane temu, co obce. Wybrzmiewająca z koreańskiej sztuki ideologia dobrze wpisuje się w przedstawioną w O gramatologii Jacques Derridy logikę […]

Forbes: Społeczeństwo siwieje. Lepiej się przygotować, niż załamywać ręce

Nadchodzące dekady przeobrażą światowe miasta. W krótszej perspektywie zmiany będą spuścizną pandemii, natomiast w dłuższej – pokłosiem demografii. Trendów demograficznych prawdopodobnie nie odwrócimy, dlatego warto się zastanowić, jak przystosować otoczenie do starzejącego się społeczeństwa

Azjatech #222: Kazachstan staje się regionalnym liderem innowacyjności w onkologii

Azjatech to cotygodniowy przegląd najważniejszych informacji o innowacjach i technologii w krajach Azji, tworzony przez zespół analityków Instytutu Boyma we współpracy z Polskim Towarzystwem Wspierania Przedsiębiorczości.

Tydzień w Azji #137: Dyplomatyczna ofensywa Niemiec na Bliskim Wschodzie i w Azji Centralnej

Przegląd Tygodnia w Azji to zbiór najważniejszych informacji ze świata polityki i gospodarki państw azjatyckich mijającego tygodnia, tworzony przez analityków Instytutu Boyma we współpracy z Polskim Towarzystwem Wspierania Przedsiębiorczości.

Współpraca włosko-azjatycka: instytucje kulturalne

Historia stosunków dyplomatycznych Włoch z krajami azjatyckimi. Przegląd włoskich instytucji kulturalnych zajmujących się tematami azjatyckimi, ze szczególnym uwzględnieniem Japonii, Korei Południowej i Chin.

Tydzień w Azji #181: Najbogatszy Azjata rozpoczyna ekspansję zagraniczną. Na celowniku – szlak do Europy

Przegląd Tygodnia w Azji to zbiór najważniejszych informacji ze świata polityki i gospodarki państw azjatyckich mijającego tygodnia, tworzony przez analityków Instytutu Boyma we współpracy z Polskim Towarzystwem Wspierania Przedsiębiorczości.

Azjatech #174: Węgiel może być czysty. Japonia już to testuje

Azjatech to cotygodniowy przegląd najważniejszych informacji o innowacjach i technologii w krajach Azji, tworzony przez zespół analityków Instytutu Boyma we współpracy z Polskim Towarzystwem Wspierania Przedsiębiorczości.

Ekonomia konfliktów zbrojnych – czy wojna się jeszcze opłaca?

Serdecznie zapraszamy na spotkanie 26 lutego w biurze WeWork Mennica Legacy Tower, przy ul. Prostej 20. Tematem debaty będzie ekonomia konfliktów zbrojnych i to, czy w dzisiejszym świecie wojna jeszcze się opłaca.

Tydzień w Azji #29: Pesymizm chińskich konsumentów

Przegląd Tygodnia w Azji to zbiór najważniejszych informacji ze świata polityki i gospodarki państw azjatyckich mijającego tygodnia, tworzony przez analityków Instytutu Boyma we współpracy z Polskim Towarzystwem Wspierania Przedsiębiorczości.

„Obyś była matką tysiąca synów” – status kobiety w społeczeństwie indyjskim

Konstytucja Indii z 1950 roku wprowadziła zasadę równości szans płci, która przyznaje kobietom i mężczyznom takie same prawa w życiu rodzinnym, politycznym, społecznym i gospodarczym. Dlaczego zatem prawie czterdzieści procent dziewczynek w wieku 15-17 lat nie uczęszcza do szkół, wciąż kultywuje się zwyczaj przekazywania posagu a prenatalna selekcja płci to nadal ogromny społeczny problem?

Byungjin – kolejna fasada Pyongyangu

„Kiyông wysłuchiwał ich egzaltowanych, skrajnie nieprzekonujących odpowiedzi i kiwał głową. Ich ślepa wiara w ideologię Chuch’e w rzeczywistości zaczęła odbierać mu własną pewność ideologiczną. Jak mogli wierzyć w nią bez cienia wątpliwości? Po przeczytaniu kilku cienkich broszurek? Niektórzy działacze twierdzili nawet, że jej siła polega na, ściśle mówiąc, łatwości zrozumienia. W przeciwieństwie do zagmatwanych i […]

W sprawie konfliktu na Bliskim Wschodzie: List Malika Dahlana do Prezydenta Isaaca Herzoga

Ten list został włączony do naszej serii „Głosy z Azji”, gdyż uznaliśmy go za istotny komentarz do trwającej dyskusji dotyczącej trwającego konfliktu na Bliskim Wschodzie.

Azjatech #80: Czy wyobraźnia sztucznej inteligencji dorówna ludzkiej?

Azjatech to cotygodniowy przegląd najważniejszych informacji o innowacjach i technologii w krajach Azji, tworzony przez zespół analityków Instytutu Boyma we współpracy z Polskim Towarzystwem Wspierania Przedsiębiorczości.

Kwartalnik Boyma – nr 3 (5) /2020

W nowej rzeczywistości pandemicznej oddajemy w Państwa ręce trzecie wydanie Kwartalnika Boyma w 2020 r. Poruszamy w nim szereg zagadnień związanych z COVID-19, w tym stan epidemii w Azji Centralnej i w Korei Południowej, relacjami na linii Pekin-Waszyngton, a także uwagi dotyczące tzw. „dyplomacji maseczkowej” uprawianą przez Chiny.