Publicystyka

“Green growth” may well be more of the same

Witnessing the recent flurry of political activity amid the accelerating environmental emergency, from the Green New Deal to the UN climate summits to European political initiatives, one could be forgiven for thinking that things are finally moving forward.

Instytut Boyma 27.01.2020

Witnessing the recent flurry of political activity amid the accelerating environmental emergency, from the Green New Deal to the UN climate summits to European political initiatives, one could be forgiven for thinking that things are finally moving forward. Even though none of the specific measures under discussion is ultimately up to the task on its own, climate has entered political vocabulary and is here to stay. The question however is not simply how to go beyond paying mere lip service and ensure lofty pledges become reality. The question is whether the ideological underpinnings of these mesures have the necessary potential for envisioning and initiating meaningful change.

Increasingly, the answer seems to be “no”.

The problem is not only that these initiatives – and others in the same vein – have failed to deliver on their promises or are unlikely to ever come to fruition. The problem is this: Even if they succeeded by their own account, they would still operate within a political and economic system that arguably cannot by definition stave off the crises to come, and whose continued existence virtually guarantees the worst-case scenarios will become reality.

The way we have been going about the environmental emergency invites hypocrisy. One of the most glaring examples is infrastructural investments aimed at facilitating transportation and trade. Often touted as “green”, they continue apace despite the fact that not only do they require aggressive resource extraction, generate waste, emit carbon dioxide, and destroy wildlife habitats, but they are also bound to lock in further environmental damage for decades to come (to put it simply, more roads mean more traffic). What is expected to power those gigantic infrastructural projects is another gigantic infrastructural project: renewable energy. While we do our best to overlook the fact that “transition to renewables is going to require a dramatic increase in the extraction of metals and rare-earth minerals, with real ecological and social costs”, the truth remains the same: “The only truly clean energy is less energy”[1].

Effective PR allows governments and businesses alike to couch harmful initiatives in the soothing language of purported sustainability. While growing numbers of consumers and analysts take such proclamations with a pinch of salt, most still seem to barely even notice. After all, pouring concrete has been the symbol of the miracle of economic growth for generations, and the whirring blades of a wind turbine promise to become another one in the foreseeable future.

What we need to consider is the following: What if overconsumption that sends our mammalian instincts into overdrive and provides the current economic and political system with justification for its existence and for the means it takes to sustain itself simply cannot continue? What if the necessary reduction and reversal of our impacts on the planet’s climate system, as well as on its overall environmental condition, cannot be achieved within the confines of our current economic paradigm? What if the juggernaut of perpetual growth and free trade is inherently incompatible with the continued habitability of the biosphere that we take for granted? What if “green growth” is indeed a fantasy and a trick we fool ourselves with? What if we need to rebuild the system we inhabit from the ground up, and fast?

Faced with these questions, it’s perfectly understandable to come to the conclusion that all the much-touted recent initiatives are nothing but treading water, or worse. That’s where alternatives come in. Advocates of “degrowth” or “post-growth” propose more than an overhaul of the system: They recommend replacing it with one better aligned with the planetary realities we can no longer ignore. As one definition puts it, degrowth is “a downscaling of production and consumption that increases human well-being and enhances ecological conditions and equity on the planet”, which “challenge[s] the centrality of GDP as an overarching policy objective” and where the “primacy of efficiency will be substituted by a focus on sufficiency”[2]. “Humanity has to understand itself as part of the planetary ecological system”, according to another formulation that emphasises a need for “a fundamental transformation of our lives and an extensive cultural change”[3]. Yet another interpretation provides a crucial clarifying point: “Post-growth economies and societies will not be static; they will be developing still, but within planetary limits, and they will not be betting their futures on the assumption of endless material growth”[4]. The path that we have taken is just one among many, and it has already shown its true colours. We don’t have to stay on it.

But the predicament we are in is this: Whichever country begins applying degrowth first may find itself at the mercy of the increasingly anarchic international system. What it faces may not necessarily be an old-school military invasion by a foreign power, but a much more pernicious threat: hostile takeover. In the absence of strong international cooperation and institutions, the global commons are up for grabs. We are being discouraged from doing the right thing.

It has become trivially easy for any major player on the global stage to say all the right things about the environment and trumpet technological solutions far and wide, while at the same time pushing one brute-force carbon-intensive infrastructural project after another in pursuit of more material wealth and at the expense of energy that environmentally we can no longer afford. Appearing to lead can often be just that: an appearance. In the short term it is easier to lead the unsuspecting (or even acquiescing) audience on. Some are expert at this: It is not far-fetched to say that Donald Trump could easily win favours with the global public opinion by adopting green rhetoric while carrying on with his ecocidal policies. His base would no doubt buy into that as well.

The challenge the efforts to prioritise climate and the environment face is this: By making it clear how deep and wide the necessary transformation needs to be, they risk triggering a powerful self-preservation pushback from those who benefit from the status quo. They already have. Alternative paths to human well-being within the natural world are already being dismissed as too difficult or outlandish to even contemplate. As the debate heats up together with the climate, we are speeding – with our streamlined rhetoric and polished slogans – towards the edge of the cliff.

Niniejszy materiał znajdą Państwo w Kwartalniku Boyma nr – 3/2020

Przypisy:

[1] Jason Hickel. “The Limits of Clean Energy”. Foreign Policy 6.09.2019. https://foreignpolicy.com/2019/09/06/the-path-to-clean-energy-will-be-very-dirty-climate-change-renewables/

[2] Definition. degrowth.com (n.d.). https://degrowth.org/definition-2/

[3] What is degrowth? degrowth.info (n.d.). https://www.degrowth.info/en/what-is-degrowth/

[4][4]  Ian Christie, Ben Gallant, Simon Mair. “Growing pain: the delusion of boundless economic growth”. Open Democracy 26.09.2019. https://www.opendemocracy.net/en/oureconomy/growing-pain-delusion-boundless-economic-growth/

Dawid Juraszek

Ekspert ds. globalnych problemów środowiskowych. Pisarz, poeta, publicysta, wieloletni wykładowca w chińskim szkolnictwie wyższym. Doktorant Uniwersytetu w Maastricht, absolwent filologii angielskiej, przywództwa w oświacie, zarządzania środowiskiem i stosunków międzynarodowych. Poza Polską publikował w USA, Wielkiej Brytanii, Kanadzie i Australii.

czytaj więcej

Tydzień w Azji: Korea Południowa w światowym wyścigu technologicznym- standard 6G już w 2026 roku?

Na początku sierpnia tego roku premier Korei Południowej Chung Se-kyun przedstawił rządową strategię wsparcia krajowego przemysłu technologicznego w badaniach nad rozwojem kolejnej generacji sieci komórkowej, mającej zastąpić dopiero co wprowadzony standard 5G.

„Miasto samowystarczalne” – rozmowa z Honoratą Grzesikowską – dyrektorem biura Guallart Architects

MSC: W sierpniu 2020 r. firma, w której jest od pięciu lat jest Pani dyrektorem biura – wygrała międzynarodowy „konkurs na projekt architektoniczny Xiong’an z cechami chińskimi, zgodnie z zasadą wysokiej jakości”. Zwycięstwo zapewnił Państwu projekt ”Miasto samowystarczalne”.

Adrian Zwoliński gościem podcastu Dział Zagraniczny

Analityk Instytutu Boyma opowiadał o ekonomicznej koncepcji Szczęścia Narodowego Brutto w Bhutanie, o jej ciemnej stronie oraz o gospodarczych uwarunkowaniach tego państwa.

Forbes: Wielka Brytania po brexicie chce wrócić na Pacyfik

W przeszłości Wielka Brytania dominowała nad wodami i wybrzeżami Indopacyfiku jako kolonialne imperium, nad którym nigdy nie zachodziło słońce. (...) Dzisiaj, już po definitywnym opuszczeniu Unii Europejskiej, poszukując nowej roli na arenie międzynarodowej Wielka Brytania stara się wrócić na Indopacyfik

Forbes: Klan nietykalnych, czyli ciemna strona południowokoreańskich czeboli

Szefowie Samsunga nie zawsze grali czysto. Zarówno syn jak i wnuk założyciela słynnego czebola mają na swoich kontach bogatą historię skandali gospodarczo-korupcyjnych, które za każdym razem mocno wstrząsały opinią publiczną.

Forbes: Społeczeństwo siwieje. Lepiej się przygotować, niż załamywać ręce

Nadchodzące dekady przeobrażą światowe miasta. W krótszej perspektywie zmiany będą spuścizną pandemii, natomiast w dłuższej – pokłosiem demografii. Trendów demograficznych prawdopodobnie nie odwrócimy, dlatego warto się zastanowić, jak przystosować otoczenie do starzejącego się społeczeństwa

Kwartalnik Boyma – nr 2 (4) /2020

Tematem wiodącym Kwartalnika Boyma #4 jest bezpieczeństwo. Nie ograniczyliśmy się jednak do tradycyjnego rozumienia tego terminu zawężonego do spraw militarnych i stosunków międzynarodowych. Naszym celem było możliwie szerokie ujęcie problemu, stąd sporo miejsca poświęciliśmy energetyce.

Tydzień w Azji #99: Wino, węgiel, miedź. Chiński atak na Australię ostrzeżeniem dla Polski

Przegląd Tygodnia w Azji to zbiór najważniejszych informacji ze świata polityki i gospodarki państw azjatyckich mijającego tygodnia, tworzony przez analityków Instytutu Boyma we współpracy z Polskim Towarzystwem Wspierania Przedsiębiorczości

Forbes: Nadchodzi exodus? Inwestorzy wycofują pieniądze z Chin

Obawy związane z konsekwencjami napięć w relacjach chińsko-amerykańskich i zacieśniania kontroli nad gospodarką przez Pekin nie odstraszały do tej pory inwestorów od rozpoczynania kolejnych projektów w Chinach.

Debata o Morzu Południowochińskim – fotorelacja

11 lipca odbyła się debata na temat przyszłości Morza Południowochińskiego organizowana wspólnie z Instytutem Socjologii UW.

Statut Fundacji

Statut Fundacji INSTYTUT STUDIÓW AZJATYCKICH I GLOBALNYCH IM. MICHAŁA BOYMA z dnia 1 grudnia 2018 r., zmieniony oświadczeniem Fundatora z dnia 21 marca 2019 r.

Wybory w Turkmenistanie. Dynastia ma się dobrze

O zmianie na prezydenckim stanowisku mówiło się w Turkmenistanie już od pewnego czasu. Oczywiście nie miało to nic wspólnego z przewidywaną porażką rządzącego żelazną ręką Gurbunguły Berdimuchamedowa, bowiem taki scenariusz jest w tej autorytarnie rządzonej republice po prostu nierealny.

RP: Południowokoreański rynek e-commerce – jak działa?

Korea Południowa to najbardziej cyfrowe społeczeństwo świata. Nie dziwi więc, że południowokoreański rynek e-commerce kwitnie w najlepsze.

Tydzień w Azji #98: Chińczycy znowu bliżej z Rosjanami. Dla Gazpromu to jak dar z niebios

Przegląd Tygodnia w Azji to zbiór najważniejszych informacji ze świata polityki i gospodarki państw azjatyckich mijającego tygodnia, tworzony przez analityków Instytutu Boyma we współpracy z Polskim Towarzystwem Wspierania Przedsiębiorczości.

Relacja z wyjazdu badawczego w ramach projektu Transcultural Caravan 2021

Z radością informujemy, że studenci biorący udział w tegorocznej edycji projektu Transcultural Caravan, organizowanego we współpracy naszego Instytutu z niemieckim Uniwersytetem Zeppelina, odbyli wyjazd badawczy do Gdańska, Warszawy, Łodzi i Duisburga.

Azjatech #115: USA układają na nowo cyfrowe puzzle na Indopacyfiku

Azjatech to cotygodniowy przegląd najważniejszych informacji o innowacjach i technologii w krajach Azji, tworzony przez zespół analityków Instytutu Boyma we współpracy z Polskim Towarzystwem Wspierania Przedsiębiorczości.

Krzysztof Zalewski panelistą w debacie Nowej Konfederacji „Dylemat indyjskiej potęgi: sojusz z Chinami czy USA?”

Krzysztof Zalewski uczestniczył w debacie zorganizowanej przez Dział Azjatycki Nowej Konfederacji.

Paweł Behrendt dla RMF 24 o wizycie Pelosi na Tajwanie: Ma olbrzymie znaczenie symboliczne

Serdecznie zapraszamy do odsłuchania zapisu rozmowy analityka Instytutu Boyma Pawła Behrendta, który w rozmowie z dziennikarzem RMF FM Michałem Zielińskim skomentował wizytę Nancy Pelosi na Tajwanie.

Azjatech #58: Koronawirus zmienia kulturę pracy w Japonii

Azjatech to cotygodniowy przegląd najważniejszych informacji o innowacjach i technologii w krajach Azji, tworzony przez zespół analityków Instytutu Boyma we współpracy z Polskim Towarzystwem Wspierania Przedsiębiorczości.

„Przywództwo” w organizacjach regionalnych: relacja między interesami a tożsamością kolektywną – projekt Anny Grzywacz

Z radością informujemy, iż analityczka Instytutu Boyma dr Anna Grzywacz została zwyciężczynią finansowanego przez Narodowe Centrum Nauki konkursu Miniatura 4.

Forbes: Ciemne chmury nad Chinami. Zostają coraz bardziej w tyle

Chińska branża półprzewodników — czyli produktów, na których opiera się cała nowoczesna gospodarka — notuje kolejne sukcesy. Jednak wiele z nich ma powierzchowny charakter, a chińskie firmy tak samo jak inne są podatne na geopolityczne zawirowania i wstrząsy.

Tydzień w Azji #81: Japonia podnosi wiek emerytalny. Będzie można pracować do 70 i dłużej

Przegląd Tygodnia w Azji to zbiór najważniejszych informacji ze świata polityki i gospodarki państw azjatyckich mijającego tygodnia, tworzony przez analityków Instytutu Boyma we współpracy z Polskim Towarzystwem Wspierania Przedsiębiorczości.

Adrian Zwoliński dla Kultury Liberalnej: Chiny – biała plama na mapie kampanii prezydenckiej

W kampanii prezydenckiej polityka zagraniczna była traktowana po macoszemu. Szczególnie zaniedbany został wątek Chin, dla których Warszawa jest jednym z kluczowych europejskich ośrodków. Czy Andrzej Duda będzie potrafił to wykorzystać podczas drugiej kadencji?

RP: Indie – co trzeba wiedzieć wchodząc na rynek indyjski?

Po pandemicznym załamaniu ekonomii Indie powinny, wedle ostatnich prognoz Banku Światowego, wrócić na szybką ścieżkę rozwoju, w granicach 10 proc. wzrostu PKB rocznie. Nie dziwi zatem, że wielu inwestorów coraz częściej spogląda właśnie w kierunku największej demokracji świata.