Publicystyka

Interview: Globalization of business, education and China: interview with prof. Chiwen Jevons Lee

A Brief Scetch : He has taught at many leading institutions around the world, such as University of Chicago, University of Pennsylvania, Tulane University in U.S., Tsinghua University, Peking University in Beijing, HKUST in Hong Kong, National University of Singapore, …

Instytut Boyma 30.01.2020

Ewelina Horoszkiewicz: Hello, Professor Lee. I want to thank you for taking the time out of your busy schedule to meet with me.

Chi-Wen Jevons Lee: The pleasure is all mine, I always admire individuals with the will to learn.

EH: Today, I would like to discuss your contribution to the globalization of Chinese business education and your thoughts of China’s role in the global marketplace. But before we begin, I’d like to get to know your story a little bit better. Who is Chi-Wen Lee, where did he come from?

CWJL: My full name is Chi-Wen Jevons Lee. I was born during the second world war, in China. I didn’t stay there long. My father was part of the Nationalist army that retreated to Taiwan. I spent most of my childhood there with my parents and six siblings.

EH: That was a very large family. What was it like growing up in Taiwan? Did you feel welcomed by Taiwan or did you still feel attached to China?

CWJL: The Mainland Chinese were rejected by the Taiwanese Chinese even though we were from the same heritage. Taiwan was previously occupied by the Japanese. The Japanese had a very close relationship with Taiwan. When the mainlanders came over, we didn’t come in waves, we came as a tsunami. The millions that flooded Taiwan also brought extreme poverty as the tiny island resources struggled to support the refugees. I remember waking up in the middle of the night with aching hunger pains, but this wasn’t just my experience, it was a very poor generation for Taiwan.

EH: There’s a Chinese saying about success being found in the darkest of places. How did this experience shape your life decisions?

CWJL: With such a large population spread over such distance, the Imperial Chinese system of authority used the National Exam as the key to a better life. This traditional mindset carried on to Taiwan. I wasn’t the best student, but I knew that this wasn’t the life I wanted to live. I knew that I had to get into the best universities to get a chance at a better life. I competed with the local Taiwanese and Mainland Refugees for a seat in the National Taiwan University, Economics Department.

EH: And after you secured that position, you were one of the first generations of students with opportunities abroad.

CWJL: It was truly a matter of being in the right place at the right time. The global trends indicated that China would be a leading economic and political power. With a country of this size, China was destined for a position of power on the global stage. But the Cultural Revolution closed off for many years. This meant that if people wanted to invest in the future of China, Taiwan was one of the best options. I remember that almost everyone in my graduating class was swept up by the West. It was a big talent loss for China. The moment the top performing minds of Taiwan graduated, they migrated abroad. But looking back now, this helped the development of China indirectly. Most of the members of my class and the following alumnus ended up taking the resources and knowledges that they gained abroad back to help build China into the country it is today.

EH: This sounds like a big break, a brave new world out there. What did you notice upon moving to the new environment?

CWJL: The biggest challenge was language. Not just language, but the cultural way we use language. Language, itself is not difficult, it’s just a database, but succeeding in a foreign environment means that you must carve out a place for yourself. A cultural grasp of the language and an outgoing personality will take you far. Intelligence will only take you so far. The valedictorian and salutatorian all failed out of their programs in the US. My grades weren’t the best, not bad, but definitely with room for improvement. But I achieved a significant amount of success despite my unremarkable academics. I also noticed a difference in attitude. For many of my American peers, their career achievements felt like an option, something that would be nice to have. But for me and my Taiwanese classmates, there were no other options. We were left afloat in these unfamiliar lands, we had to thrive. It was a long swim back home.

EH: I looked over your long list of accomplishments. I am curious, after all your efforts to make it in America, what brought you back to Asia?

CWJL: Good luck and good fortune. Opportunity came knocking and I couldn’t say no. Hong Kong had planned the first international university built by the Chinese for the Chinese. This was a project with great ambitions rivaling the global education establishments. They needed a world class staff for the world class institution. I had made a name for myself amongst the scholars abroad and when I was offered the position, I took it and never looked back. This was a great opportunity for self-development, this was my chance to build an institution from the ground up. Within four years, HKUST was ranked internationally and my accounting department was ranked first!

EH: That was quite the achievement! It must have opened many doors for you.

CWJL: It was a miracle of a miracle. I had the pleasure of meeting many brilliant and talented people during my time at HKUST. We had a few Nobel Prize winning visiting professors. These connections prominently positioned me in the world of academia. When I returned to Tulane University, I began receiving offers all across China. We broke ground on the Tulane – Fudan University collaboration where we brought the best and the brightest minds of China to the US. China had a complex relationship with the rest of the world, especially America. While the Chinese populace was fascinated with the luxuries and options of the west, the political stance was one of icy wariness. But China was a burgeoning country, it couldn’t contain it’s appetite for knowledge and growth. Fudan University in Shanghai was the beginning of a trend that would sweep over the world.

EH: Can you tell me more about this trend that you noticed? How did it manifest itself in China?

CWJL: The trend that I noticed was the globalization of business education. With static, domestic markets, business was heavily influenced by the systems in place, who you knew, the resources you had access to was the game changer. The well-established business schools in America helped cultivate the network for these resources. But as the pace of change and dynamic-ism of the business world increased, business became less straightforward. We are in a globalized market in search of localized solutions. Business education is a function of market need. As the global marketplace has globalized, the business education classroom has also globalized. This was the introduction of the case study to the business classroom. As the business world became more dynamic, the best solution wasn’t always the most worn path. In the chaos of the business world, the need for localized insight opened doors for all participants. Business is a world where brilliant minds clash to find a better answer for the eternal problem, how to create more value. These weren’t solutions that you could find in a textbook, this is the wisdom that had to be gained through the experience of success and failures. And as Asia and the rest of the world entered the global marketplaces, we see it reflected in the business classrooms. More and more diversified classes bringing unique insights and solutions to the every growing world around us.

EH: I find it interesting how the business classroom is a reflection of market demands. In recent years, China has taken a substantial role globally, politically, socially, but the most notable change has been economic. What are your insights into the larger Chinese business environment and what the rest of the world can learn from China.

CWJL: While China has experienced tremendous growth in the past few decades, this is more a function of playing catch up. China was able to draw upon the lessons and experiences of the countries that had developed before it. When China opened its doors and foreign investments flowed in, China bloomed. But China is still not yet ready to teach other countries how to do business. The Chinese Imperial Rule has been ingrained into the culture for the past three to four thousand years. The traditional emphasis on standardized testing is as disconnected as it is prevalent in modern day China. In my experience, the highest academic achievers were rarely the best business people. As a manager, your ability to work through complex mental problems is not as important as your ability to influence people. That’s what business is, the ability to create value in a way that influences other people’s behavior. I began China’s transformation in creating the first EMBA and MBA program at Fudan, Tsinghua, Zhejiang, Xiamen University that selected individuals not based on test scores, but on the holistic person. Now, it’s up to the future of China to realize what it means to be a Chinese Business Person.

EH: I really appreciated the insight you shared into what business means and how the globalization of the world with a Chinese focus might mean for the future of business education. Thank you for your time, Professor Lee, it was a pleasure.

CWJL: The pleasure was all mine. I look forward to reading about myself.

Niniejszy materiał znajdą Państwo w Kwartalniku Boyma nr – 3/2020

Ewelina Horoszkiewicz

Analityk Instytutu Boyma ds. Chin. Absolwentka Contemporary China Studies na Uniwersytecie Renmin w Pekinie. Do jej zainteresowań należą tematy nacjonalizmu, feminizmu i migracji we współczesnych Chinach. Posługuje się językiem chińskim. Ukończyła również sinologię i zarządzanie na Uniwersytecie Warszawskim.

czytaj więcej

Forbes: Jak Koreańczycy znaleźli kamień filozoficzny innowacji

O innowacyjności gospodarki decydują polityki publiczne oraz zarządzanie procesami biznesowymi. Wielu na świecie poszukuje idealnej formuły takiego połączenia government i biznesowego governance, która – niczym kamień filozoficzny w średniowieczu – obiecuje bogactwo, tym razem poprzez kontrolę nad kluczowymi technologiami...

Azjatech #174: Węgiel może być czysty. Japonia już to testuje

Azjatech to cotygodniowy przegląd najważniejszych informacji o innowacjach i technologii w krajach Azji, tworzony przez zespół analityków Instytutu Boyma we współpracy z Polskim Towarzystwem Wspierania Przedsiębiorczości.

Historia bogaczy Hongkongu, czyli “the four big”

Dwie najważniejsze metropolie Azji południowo-wschodniej to Singapur i Hongkong. Obie są bogatymi centrami handlu i finansów, obie były Brytyjskimi koloniami. Przy czym, gdy pierwszą z jej czystymi ulicami, niezwykłymi ogrodami, organizacją, nudą i bogactwem, można by porównać do pięknej arystokratki, o drugiej nie można by mówić z takim zachwytem.

Fake newsy i farmy trolli – streszczenie spotkania

W dniu 17 grudnia br. w siedzibie Instytutu Boyma odbyła się autorska debata na podstawie reportaży wcieleniowych Anny Sobolewskiej i Katarzyny Pruszkiewicz. Dziennikarki przedstawiły w jaki sposób wygląda praca w przemyśle dezinformacji, a także wyjaśniły jak tworzenie manipulowanych i opłacanych wypowiedzi w Internecie może wpłynąć na opinię publiczną.

Azjatech #111: Nawigacja niesatelitarna dla japońskich pojazdów autonomicznych

Azjatech to cotygodniowy przegląd najważniejszych informacji o innowacjach i technologii w krajach Azji, tworzony przez zespół analityków Instytutu Boyma we współpracy z Polskim Towarzystwem Wspierania Przedsiębiorczości.

RP: Dwie indyjskie umowy liberalizujące handel na horyzoncie. Wnioski dla Europy?

Coraz bardziej realne staje się zawarcie umowy handlowej Unia Europejska - Indie. Dlatego warto wyciągać wnioski z zakończonych niedawno negocjacji Indii ze Zjednoczonymi Emiratami Arabskimi i Australią.

Azjatech #11: Uzbekistan wyprodukuje papier z kamienia

Azjatech to cotygodniowy przegląd najważniejszych informacji o innowacjach i technologii w krajach Azji, tworzony przez zespół analityków Instytutu Boyma we współpracy z Polskim Towarzystwem Wspierania Przedsiębiorczości.

Afgański impas w Azji Centralnej

Choć wojna w Afganistanie w zasadzie dobiegła końca, to wciąż odległe wydaje się zakończenie procesu pokojowego w tym kraju. Polityka talibskich władz nie znajduje zrozumienia w części afgańskiego społeczeństwa ani akceptacji w wielu krajach, zwłaszcza demokratycznego Zachodu.

Kwartalnik Boyma – informacje ogólne

Podstawowe informacje o Kwartalniku Boyma

Azjatech #196: Seul zainwestuje ponad miliard dolarów w startupy

Azjatech to cotygodniowy przegląd najważniejszych informacji o innowacjach i technologii w krajach Azji, tworzony przez zespół analityków Instytutu Boyma we współpracy z Polskim Towarzystwem Wspierania Przedsiębiorczości.

Tydzień w Azji: Jak z mapy drogowej zrobić plan podróży. Co nowego wiemy po szczycie UE-Indie o wzajemnych relacjach i jak Polska mogłaby się w nie pełniej włączyć?

15 lipca w formie wideokonferencji odbył się 15. szczyt UE-Indie, zastępując przełożone w marcu z powodu pandemii spotkanie w Brukseli.

Już wkrótce: Targi China Homelife 2019

Już wkrótce, 29 maja 2019 roku, w Nadarzynie w hali PTAK Expo rozpoczną się największe w Europie Środkowo-Wschodniej targi: China Homelife 2019. Polska jako ważny punkt na planie Nowego Jedwabnego Szlaku stanowi dla Chińczyków istotne miejsce do nawiązywania relacji biznesowych.

Are “Climate Refugees” (Just) About Climate?

As the awareness of the scale and pervasiveness of climate impacts on human societies keeps rising, so does the frequency with which the terms “climate refugees” and “climate migrants” are being used in the public discourse “to describe those who are being displaced due to adverse consequences related to climate change” (Atapattu, 2020). One might be forgiven to think these terms – given their apparent utility and ubiquity – are purely descriptive and conveniently straightforward. Not quite. And contesting their seeming obviousness is key to tackling the issues that they purport to describe.

Tydzień w Azji #161: Chiny lawirują wobec wojny na Ukrainie

Przegląd Tygodnia w Azji to zbiór najważniejszych informacji ze świata polityki i gospodarki państw azjatyckich mijającego tygodnia, tworzony przez analityków Instytutu Boyma we współpracy z Polskim Towarzystwem Wspierania Przedsiębiorczości.

Tydzień w Azji #60: Rosja, Stany, Arabia Saudyjska. Kto pierwszy odpuści w wojnie cenowej?

Przegląd Tygodnia w Azji to zbiór najważniejszych informacji ze świata polityki i gospodarki państw azjatyckich mijającego tygodnia, tworzony przez analityków Instytutu Boyma we współpracy z Polskim Towarzystwem Wspierania Przedsiębiorczości.

Korea Południowa w oczekiwaniu na Joe Bidena. Jak zmiana prezydenta USA wpłynie na Półwysep Koreański?

Zmiana na stanowisku Prezydenta USA będzie miała ogromny wpływ także na sytuację wielu pozostałych państw świata, w których Amerykanie odgrywają ważną rolę. Nie inaczej jest w przypadku Korei Południowej, gdzie zarówno rządzący jak i świat biznesu przygotowują się do nowego formatu relacji z największym mocarstwem świata.

Jak Seth Rogen i James Franco wzmocnili reżim Korei Północnej

Nieznana jest dokładna liczba osób, które obejrzały już film Wywiad ze Słońcem Narodu (E. Goldberg, S. Rogen, 2014). Obraz, który początkowo miał nazywać się Zabić Kim Dzong Una, w ciągu 20 godzin od pojawienia się w Internecie został nielegalnie ściągnięty aż 750,000 razy. Portale udostępniające film odnotowywały rekordowe ilości „wejść”. Wszystko za sprawą głośnego ataku […]

Tydzień w Azji: Wyboista droga współpracy – Chiny eskalują napięcie w Azji Centralnej

Polityka ChRL wobec republik Azji Centralnej od wielu lat ukierunkowana jest na budowanie pozytywnych relacji, rozszerzanie współpracy w wielu obszarach i dbałość władz Państwa Środka o unikanie poczucia chińskiej dominacji wśród mieszkańców regionu...

Azjatech #187: Chiny biorą się za chatboty. Chcą, by szanowały podstawowe zasady socjalizmu

Azjatech to cotygodniowy przegląd najważniejszych informacji o innowacjach i technologii w krajach Azji, tworzony przez zespół analityków Instytutu Boyma we współpracy z Polskim Towarzystwem Wspierania Przedsiębiorczości.

Azjatech #7: Chiny rozwijają inteligentne technologie identyfikacji ludzi

Azjatech to cotygodniowy przegląd najważniejszych informacji o innowacjach i technologii w krajach Azji, tworzony przez zespół analityków Instytutu Boyma we współpracy z Polskim Towarzystwem Wspierania Przedsiębiorczości. W tym numerze najświeższe wiadomości o technologiach z Chin, Izraela oraz Tajlandii.

Forbes: Czy jeśli Polska wykluczy chińskie firmy z budowy 5G, to Chiny zablokują polskie jabłka?

Pekin od lat współtworzy mit wielkiego chińskiego rynku, który mogą podbić polskie firmy. Wraz z polityką luzowania pandemicznych obostrzeń za Wielkim Murem, narracja ta powraca także przy okazji debaty o 5G w Polsce.

Jak znaleźć miejsce między potęgami, czyli poglądy polityczne Lee Kuan Yewa, ojca nowoczesnego Singapuru

W marcu 2019 roku minęła czwarta rocznica śmierci Lee Kuan Yew (LKY), najbardziej wpływowego singapurskiego polityka, ojca narodu, pierwszego i wieloletniego premiera (1959-1990). LKY stał się symbolem Singapuru i jest uważany za polityka, któremu udało się uczynić z byłej brytyjskiej kolonii nowoczesne państwo.

Tydzień w Azji #92: Hojniejsi niż Hollywood. Nowa siła może przesądzić o prezydenturze w USA

Przegląd Tygodnia w Azji to zbiór najważniejszych informacji ze świata polityki i gospodarki państw azjatyckich mijającego tygodnia, tworzony przez analityków Instytutu Boyma we współpracy z Polskim Towarzystwem Wspierania Przedsiębiorczości.

Chiny – USA na Morzu Południowochińskim

Wojna handlowa jest tylko jednym z aspektów konfrontacji między Stanami Zjednoczonymi i Chińską Republiką Ludową. Wiele aspektów tej rywalizacji zbiega się na Morzu Południowochińskim.